I’m Hungry! What I Feed My Pack

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about the food I feed my pack.

I know that we have touched on nutrition before in other articles, I just wanted to let everyone know what I feed my pack and why. I like  Orijen Puppy Grain-Free Dry Dog Food.
I can’t find a better dry food. It has no by-products, no fillers, only a large amount of quality protein (from multiple sources), vegetables and fruits. It is expensive, but like I said, I can’t find another food that is even close. I have people ask me, “what about Blue? Or what about Natural Balance”? There are other foods out there that don’t contain grains and may have vegetables and fruits. What sets Orijen apart, is the multiple sources of proteins.

Here is the ingredients list directly from Orijen’s web site: Orijen Puppy

Boneless chicken*, chicken meal, chicken liver*, whole herring*, boneless turkey*, turkey meal, turkey liver*, whole eggs*, boneless walleye*, whole salmon*, chicken heart*, chicken cartilage*, herring meal, salmon meal, chicken liver oil, chicken fat, red lentils, green peas, green lentils, sun-cured alfalfa, yams*, pea fiber, chickpeas, pumpkin*, butternut squash*, spinach greens*, carrots*, Red Delicious apples*, Bartlett pears*, cranberries*, blueberries*, brown kelp, licorice root, angelica root, fenugreek, marigold flowers, sweet fennel, peppermint leaf, chamomile, dandelion, summer savory, rosemary, Enterococcus faecium.

* FRESH AND PRESERVATIVE-FREE

There are 11 sources of protein. If you remove the eggs, boneless walleye, whole salmon and just stay with the meal, you still have 8 protein sources. No other food has that.

Here is Blue Buffalo Dry Food for Puppies, Chicken and Rice Recipe,
:

  • Deboned Chicken,
  • Chicken Meal,
  • Whole Ground Brown Rice,
  • Oatmeal,
  • Whole Ground Barley,
  • Menhaden Fish Meal (source of DHA-Docosahexaenoic Acid),
  • Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols),
  • Flaxseed (source of Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids),
  • Natural Chicken Flavor,
  • Peas,
  • Tomato Pomace (source of Lycopene),
  • Whole Potatoes,
  • Fish Oil (source of Omega 3 Fatty Acids),

 

  • Alfalfa Meal,
  • Whole Carrots,
  • Whole Sweet Potatoes,
  • Blueberries,
  • Cranberries,
  • Apples,
  • Blackberries,
  • Pomegranate,
  • Spinach,
  • Pumpkin,
  • Barley Grass,
  • Dried Parsley,
  • Garlic,
  • Dried Kelp,
  • Yucca Schidigera Extract,
  • L-Carnitine,
  • L-Lysine,
  • Turmeric,
  • Dried Chicory Root,
  • Oil of Rosemary,
  • Beta Carotene,
  • Vitamin A Supplement,
  • Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1),
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2),
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3),
  • d-Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5),
  • Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6),
  • Biotin (Vitamin B7),
  • Folic Acid (Vitamin B9),
  • Vitamin B12 Supplement,
  • Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C),
  • Vitamin D3 Supplement,
  • Vitamin E Supplement,
  • Iron Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Zinc Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Manganese Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Copper Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Choline Chloride,
  • Sodium Selenite,
  • Calcium Iodate,
  • Salt,
  • Calcium Carbonate,
  • Potassium Chloride,
  • Caramel,

 

  • Dried Yeast (source of Saccharomyces cerevisiae),
  • Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product,
  • Dried Bacillus subtilis fermentation product,
  • Dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product

Blue Puppy is has grains and only two sources of protein.

We can go to Blue Buffalo Wilderness Grain Free Chicken Dry Puppy Food:
:

  • Deboned Chicken,
  • Chicken Meal,
  • Turkey Meal,
  • Tapioca Starch,
  • Peas,
  • Tomato Pomace (source of Lycopene),
  • Dried Egg,
  • Natural Chicken Flavor,
  • Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols and Citric Acid),
  • Fish Oil (source of DHA-Docosahexaenoic Acid),
  • Potatoes,
  • Flaxseed (source of Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids),
  • Alfalfa Meal,
  • Potato Starch,
  • Whole Carrots,
  • Whole Sweet Potatoes,
  • Blueberries,
  • Cranberries,
  • Barley Grass,
  • Dried Parsley,
  • Dried Kelp,
  • Taurine,
  • Yucca Schidigera Extract,
  • L-Carnitine,
  • L-Lysine,
  • Turmeric,
  • Oil of Rosemary,
  • Beta Carotene,
  • Vitamin A Supplement,
  • Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1),
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2),
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3),
  • d-Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5),
  • Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6),
  • Biotin (Vitamin B7),
  • Folic Acid (Vitamin B9),
  • Vitamin B12 Supplement,
  • Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C),
  • Vitamin D3 Supplement,
  • Vitamin E Supplement,
  • Iron Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Zinc Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Manganese Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Copper Amino Acid Chelate,
  • Choline Chloride,
  • Sodium Selenite,
  • Calcium Iodate,
  • Salt,
  • Caramel,
  • Potassium Chloride,
  • Dried Yeast (source of Saccharomyces cerevisiae),
  • Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product,
  • Dried Bacillus subtilis fermentation product,
  • Dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product

Even Blue Wilderness Puppy only has two sources of proteins.

I’m not picking on Blue, That just happens to be the name that is mostly brought up. I’m not saying Blue is not a good food, I just find Orijen to be better and if you compare the cost of each, Orijen isn’t that much more.

If you go to Orijen’s website http://www.orijen.ca you will see that they do not outsource, they do not accept frozen or preserved ingredients. They control all of the production and manufacture of the food. It’s a good company.

Many of the cheaper quality foods use what I consider to be substandard ingredients. Here are some things that you want to watch out for:

Animal Digest – This is what is left of the animal when all the meat, organs and bones are used for food. What’s left is gathered up and boiled, this is digest. Digest is added to the outside of cheap dog food the “trick” the dog into eating it.  By-Products – This is what is left of the animal when all the usable meat, acceptable organs and bones are used for food. This could be stuff like sex organs, lungs, intestines, bladder, eyes, and kidneys. What it can’t be is skin, fur, hooves.

Purina has a whole web site dedicated to telling people how great Animal Digest and By-Products are and that Purina only uses the best quality of ingredients. I personally would not buy any Purina food. They and many other cheap dog food makers use Dyes, preservatives like TBHQ, BHA, and BHT. These as well as Ethoxyquine are approved by the USDA and the FDA, but they have been proven to cause cancer in humans and animals and most are banned in the use of human food. So, why is it ok for dog food?

Another thing to watch out for is “4 D” ingredients, “4 D”, stands for Dead, Dying, Diseased and Disabled animals. Basically, if an animal is dying or died before being killed at the slaughter house the meat from the animal can not be used for human consumption, but some dog food makers use it for their dog food. Of course they do not advertise this, so you need to do your home work. My rule of thumb on dog food is, If you can buy the dog food at the local super market, or Pet Smart and Petco, I wouldn’t buy it. Go to the smaller local pet food suppliers and you will find a whole new world of healthy quality dog food.

Another thing people don’t realize is that the big dog food companies, experiment on dog and cats. Purina USDA Number 43-R-0054, has 500 dog and 700 cats in their lab. IAMS USDA Number 31-R-0018, has 235 cats and 257 dogs in their labs. As of this writing I was not able to find Blue Buffalo’s USDA Number. Go to http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/ to learn more about animal labs in dog food manufacturing.

If you like this article, please leave a comment. Don’t forget, you can get all of your pet care needs here at Daisy’s Rescue, just use the Amazon portals. We are starting new features. Rescue Wednesday: featuring select dogs from various rescues. Senior Sunday’s: featuring well deserving Senior’s looking for a forever homes.  Keep on the look out for Podcasts coming soon.  Follow us on Facebook @ www.facebook.com/daisysrescue and twitter DaisysResce@daisysrescue and email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net

Thank you, Daisy.

Save A Yorkie Rescue Inc.

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about the dog rescue organization “Save A Yorkie Inc.” serving Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

My name is Marilyn Faughner and that is my sweetheart, Donnie. We are the Founders of Save A Yorkie Rescue, Inc.I have adored Yorkies since I saw one perched on someone’s lap as a child.My husband Donnie, Treasurer and co-founder of our rescue, remembered my fascination with the breed and found one for sale in a newspaper ad in 1982.She cost me every penny of my life’s savings but I didn’t care; I cashed in everything to buy her from a back yard breeder. She was the best thing I ever invested in. Worth every penny and more.
Her name was Buffy, Ewok a Doggie, The Wonder Dog.She was the quintessential Yorkie – tiny, bossy, and loyal. She was the typical Yorkie bitch, domineering, demanding, stubborn and adorable.
I loved her with all of my heart.She was everything to me for almost 18 years. By 17, I knew the end was coming at me and I could not live without her. Buffy was blind, deaf and though she ate well, she tottered delicately on spindly legs. I knew my arms would ache with emptiness without her and that was inconceiveable to me.And so began my world wide search for another Yorkie puppy. I was like everyone else trying to find a healthy Yorkie. Visiting breeders, attending Yorkie specialities, quizzing other Yorkie owners, talking to my veterinarian – I begged for information, for contacts, for help in finding my next precious one. What did I get? A lot of cold shoulders! The Yorkie professionals were far too busy minding their business to educate me. I was so ignorant of the breed, it should have been illegal! Even though I had cared for Buffy, there was so much I didn’t know and no one had the time to teach me.
I was desolate and frustrated. How could I find a good healthy Yorkie when no one would tell me where to find one?Then it hit me like a Yorkie tearing after a Great Dane! Teach YOURSELF! Of course I could. Of course I should. Of course I would.  AND I DID! Every book, email chat room, Yorkie specialty, show judge, website, breeder, every Yorkie owner, every venue, everywhere, every thing I could find on the breed, I read it. I inhaled it. I crammed the information into every corner of my brain.I even quizzed the Queen Mother of Yorkiedom – Terry Shumsky and bought her book.  AND THEN I was armed for battle and I went searching for MY Yorkie.
After much research, I found his breeder online. But I didn’t stop there. I researched her history, her reputation, and her references until I knew what to expect from her line. Her credentials were impeccable. Her foundation sire was a finished champion in several countries. I followed her successes in shows in New York and met her long before I asked for one of her puppies. Because I had done my homework, I could “talk” Yorkie with her with ease. Still, it took me three weeks to convince her that I would be a good mom to one of her kids.
I had seen her dogs, in all their splendor, and I knew what to expect. When she asked me which dog I wanted I was ready. “I know your line, I said,  “Any dog you send to me will be perfect,” I replied. And so it was- without ever seeing a picture of any kind.   She sent me my dearest little Rascal Rudy. You can see his picture below – see what I mean? He is perfection. I loved him beyond words. He was my solace when Buffy could no longer stand. When she faced the Bridge, I held her tenderly, kissed her and cried bitter tears. The tears were for me, not for Buffy, who went to the Bridge on January 9, 2000, because it was her time. I know I will meet her there when my time comes.
 It was just Rudy and Donnie and I for awhile. Rudy seemed to miss Buffy’s grouchy presence. He loved to torment her when he wanted her to play.So without hesitation, I called my breeder again to ask for another of her treasures.She knew I was over the moon about Rudy to the point of insanity so she was not sure that a second Yorkie could be loved and given the attention he deserved.

She had just one request: that I love the second little one for his own sake, in his own right, and not as a second dog, a ‘pet’ for Rudy. I promised her to love the new comer just as he was. She had a special one in mind. She carried him in her sweater pocket and called him TiQ. I am not sure what that meant to her, but I call him TQ ’cause he is TOO QUTE!!  He, too, is perfection, see his picture below. The two of them went to obedience classes to learn their words and manners. We all played school every day so they wouldn’t forget their lessons.

(Rudy passed away on October 3, 2012. I held him when he went and even months later, I cry every day for my beloved Rudy. TiQ was still wobbley at 14 and he just passed away in my arms on October 17, 2013.  He could not see, he could not hear and he could not breathe – his time had come. Both of my cherished Yorkies are gone. I am bereft. Luckily I still have old One Eyed Max and my creamy peanut butter colored Romey who I adopted two years ago. )

 
And so we were, a happy Yorkie family, smug with success in our research. We had done it! We had purchased the best of the breed and they were so beautiful my throat ached when I gazed at them. Then one momentous day, a casual comment by a passing stranger changed my life, my family’s life and many hundreds of people’s lives.                      A thoughtful lady noticed my two boys,  my gorgeous Yorkies, and admiring them, asked if I had “rescued” them.“Rescue?” A YORKIE!??!!She had to be kidding!!!!! WHO would have to rescue a Yorkie. It’s like saying you have to rescue a Rolls Royce. Who would throw away or abuse one of these adorable little dogs?With a sad, knowing smile, she whispered, “Their owners die too.”Like a lightning bolt I understood. It was a revelation!  I never thought of it or heard of it. 

Of course there were Yorkies whose owners died and left them with no place to go. As I thought about it, I realized that there were many reasons a Yorkie might need a new home: If a senior went to a nursing home, or a family moved to an apartment or if a military person was deployed overseas, divorce, loss of a job, … etc. etc. etc. There must be many Yorkies who needed a home. Why hadn’t I thought of this? Ignorant and uninformed, I had purchased my boys from a good breeder. But now – I could not rest until I found out more about helping homeless Yorkies.

And so it began. I gave this new mission every bit as much dedication as I had my search for Yorkie information. I found Yorkie rescues in many places. Working with several different rescues, I helped to place dozens of Yorkies. Then my husband suggested that I start my own rescue. The thought overwhelmed me but I couldn’t stand the thought of any Yorkie in a shelter, scared and alone.They needed my help, and by God, I was not going to let them down.My husband, Donnie and I started Save A Yorkie Rescue, Inc. on January 1, 2002. Since that day we have saved over 2500 Yorkies. And more come in everyday. I added to my brood too. First came Cody, Cody Co Co Puff who came to me with a badly broken leg. He was a foster but I failed Fostering 101 and Cody stayed with us. Much later, I failed fostering 102 by keeping Maxatawny (who is not scrawny, in fact he’s quite brawny, just like his daddy, Donnie) Max is 18 and we adopted Romey – my beautiful peanut butter colored Yorkie boy. My arms are full. Now this is where YOU come in. If you want to help SAVE a Yorkie, contact me, we’ll carry on the mission together.

Please don’t forget to like our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue  daisysrescue@daisysrescue on twitter  daisysrescue@comcast.net  Use this site and our pet supply portal to Amazon for all your pet needs and out Amazon portal for all your shopping needs.

As always we appreciate your comments and requests.

Does Your Canned Food Hold “Water” ? Yes It Does…

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Canned dog food and how you can compare it to Dry dog food. We have guest writer Mark Whitney, Certified Canine Nutritionist and head of West Chester Canine Nutrition. Mark brings his 25 years of experience to Daisy’s Rescue to help shed some light on nutrition for your dog.

Does Your Canned Food Hold “Water”? Yes It Does…

I get this one often “My Vet wants me to put my dog on canned food because my dog has blah, blah, blah and he/she instructed me to buy canned food because it’s a LOW protein and/or LOW fat and that will help with my problem”  Unfortunately (and a little frightening…) this is untrue!!! I always like to assume they heard their Vet incorrectly…(it helps me sleep at night). At first glance that statement may seem to hold “water”…but therein lies the problem. All canned foods contain anywhere from 70% to 85% water which is an important factor when reading the nutrient level and how your dogs body handles and breaks down those nutrients.

That’s because pet food companies report the nutrient content of their products using something known as
Guaranteed Analysis. The Guaranteed Analysis is the dog food industry’s version of the Nutrition Facts panel printed on every package of human food sold in North America.
According to AAFCO rules, the guaranteed analysis must consist of the following:

  •  Minimum Percentage of Protein
  •  Minimum Percentage of Fat
  •  Maximum Percentage of Fiber
  •  Maximum Percentage of Moisture

But when using this method can be misleading.
That’s because the system used for reporting the percentages fails to consider water content
Even the Food and Drug Administration admits to the importance of this problem on its own website…Interpreting Pet Food Labels FDA

“To make meaningful comparisons of nutrient levels between a canned and dry product, they should be expressed on the same moisture basis.”

Let’s me show you how you can choose a better option for your dog.

How to Calculate Dry Matter Basis

The formula is quite simple.

Percentage of Guaranteed Analysis Component Divided by Percentage of Dry Matter
Multiplied by 100

Assuming a can of dog food contains:

  •  9% protein
  •  4% fat
  •  1% fiber
  •  81% moisture

At first glance, 9% protein looks on the very low side compared to dry dog food. Now watch this number after we convert it.
1.  Calculate the dry matter of the canned food by deducting the moisture
percentage (81%) from 100.   i.e. 100 – 81 = 19% or .19
2.  Now, using this dry matter figure of .19 apply the formula to each of
the components, as follows:
Protein: 9 divided by .19= 47.4%
Fat: 4 divided by .19= 21%
Fiber: 1 divided by .19= 5.3%
Notice the protein percentage now. Not really a LOW Protein and/or LOW Fat that you may have been looking for huh? You will find in many cases, canned dog food values tend to exceed that of dry dog food.

At first glance the dry kibble looks to be higher protein and fat compared to its canned counterpart. Take a look at the protein values after converting the data to dry matter basis…
pastedGraphic.pdf
Can you see how the canned product now lists 40% protein, compared to kibble’s 26% figure?
If you had simply followed your vets suggestion and chose the canned food because of its lower protein and lower fat content, you’d have been wrong.
The wet food actually contains much more protein and fat (on a dry matter basis) than does the kibble.

The Bottom Line

Don’t be fooled by a dog food label’s protein or fat numbers. And remember, numbers are just numbers. They can’t reveal the true quality (or the digestibility) of the product’s proteins or fats.
Be sure to take the time to look over the ingredients list. Your dog will surely be better off for your effort.

Thank you Mark. Hopfully this sesion has given you some insight on how to buy the best dog food for your dog. Mark can be contacted at info@dubcpet.com or you can call 610-314-6124. Mark’s company is West Chester Canine Nutrition.

Don’t forget to like Daisy’s Rescue Face Book Page .   facebook.com/daisysrescue

 

How To Choose The Right Food For Your Dog

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Dog Food. We have Mark Whitney a certified canine nutritionist, who is going to share his nowledge of dog food and explain how to pick the right food for your dog. Mark heads West Chester Canine Nutrition. Using his 25 years of experience, Mark helps his clients provide the best food for the needs of their dogs.

How To Choose the Right Food For Your Dog

Ask ten people what the best thing to feed your dog is and you’ll probably get ten different answers. I must get this question a hundred times a week “What is the best dog food I can buy” Some people believe that dogs are dogs and eating the $20 for 40 lb bag of dog food from the discount store is perfectly fine. Others argue that if you are not feeding your dog raw food your dogs gonna die a long painful death..

The truth is somewhere in between. Your approach to finding the best dog food for your dog is to be as educated as possible and that means reading what is listed in the ingredients on the back of
the bag, rather than paying attention to the marketing that went into the front of the bag. Here are some steps that may help.

  1. Locate the first source of fat in the ingredient list (chicken fat, salmon oil, etc. the phrase “preserved with mixed tocopherols” usually follows it ). Everything that is listed prior to the first source of fat, including that fat, make up the majority of the dog food. Food A is clearrly the winner here.. Note that the examples are for traditional foods, Limited Ingredient / Allergy Foods are critiqued differently.
    1. ex. Food AFresh deboned wild boar*, fresh deboned lamb*, fresh beef liver*, fresh deboned pork*, lamb meal, peas, salmon meal, russet potato, herring meal, fresh whole eggs*, fresh deboned bison*, potato starch, fresh deboned salmon*, pacific whitefish meal, fresh deboned walleye*, salmon oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols) = 80% Meat
    2. ex. Food B –  Chicken meal, turkey meal, lamb meal, brown rice, white rice, rice bran, peas, potatoes, oatmeal, cracked pearled barley, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols) = 20%-30% Meat
  2. When choosing a dog food, it makes good sense to favor products lower in carbohydrates (in my opinion, under 40%). Do you know how many carbs your dog should have on a daily basis to sustain life? Go ahead…Guess!! Zero!!! That’s right Zero, that’s how many carbohydrates are required by a dog to sustain life. According to the National Research Council and compared to the other two major nutrients — protein and fat — no carbs are considered essential for a healthy canine diet. Don’t get me wrong…carbohydrates aren’t bad for dogs in reasonable amounts…The problem lies in their quantity. The list of problems that to many carbs can cause for your dog is worthy of another blog. How to calculate carbs in your dogs food:

1. Here is a typical adult dry food

Minimum percentage of crude protein 26%
Minimum percentage of crude fat 15%
Maximum percentage of crude fiber 4% (Fiber is a carb..so you don’t need to subtract it out)

Maximum percentage of moisture 10%

Take 100% protein% fat% moisture% ash% (usually not listed, I avg. 8%) = Carbohydrate Using the Guaranteed analysis example above: 

Carbohydrate = 100% 26% protein 15% Fat 10% moisture 8% ash = 43% carbohydrate.

Basically that means 43% of that bag is sugar!!

2. Here is another adult dry food

Minimum percentage of crude protein 38%
Minimum percentage of crude fat 18%
Maximum percentage of crude fiber 3% (Fiber is a carb..so you don’t need to subtract it out)
Maximum percentage of moisture 10%

Take 100% protein% fat% moisture% ash% (usually not listed, I avg. 8%) = Carbohydrate Using the Guaranteed analysis example above: 

Carbohydrate = 100% 38% protein 18% Fat 10% moisture 8% ash = 26% carbohydrate.

That means 26% of that bag is sugar!!

3. A list of some ingredients to AVOID!!!

Unnamed Meat and Meat Bone Meal, Meat By-Products, Poultry By-Products, Unnamed Fish Meal, Beef Tallow, Corn or Wheat Gluten Meal, Brewers Rice, Soybean Meal, BHA, Ethoxyquin,

Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT), Salt

With these steps you are off to a good start at making a better choice for your dog. Do not rely on anyone’s information without doing your own research including consultation with a trusted veterinarian. (although when speaking to a veterinarian about nutrition this is the response I got “I am a veterinarian and I tell folks to feed any commercial diet they like. I don’t think there is a “bad” dog food on the market, though I do think that some are better than others. In general you get what you pay for, especially if you are sticking with the mainstream brands. In terms of bang-for-the-buck the Costco Kirkland brands are actually pretty impressive.”) scary huh!?!?  So be an educated consumer and a rabid advocate for your dog’s health.

 

Footnote

  1. National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, “Nutrient Requirements of Dogs and Cats”, 2006 Edition, National Academies Press, Washington, DC

 

Thank you Mark. Hopfully this sesion has given you some insight on how to buy the best dog food for your dog. Mark can be contacted at info@dubcpet.com or you can call 610-314-6124. Mark’s company is West Chester Canine Nutrition.

Don’t forget to like Daisy’s Rescue Face Book Page .   facebook.com/Daisysrescue