Canine Cancer

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about Canine Cancer.
This article is written by Lisa at Canine Cancer .org in Australia.
My name is Frodo and I am an eight year old cancer survivor. I have recently passed my four year cancer free period, so it’s looking pretty good for me now to have a normal life expectancy.

One morning four years ago, I woke up with a huge egg-like lump on my head near my ear. At first my mum thought I had bumped my head but she took me straight to the vet. He thought it was a cyst at first and when he tried to drain it nothing came out. He said he would have to operate to remove the lump.

When my mum came to pick me up after the operation the vet old her it was nothing to worry about and he got it all. Lucky for me my mum asked for it to be sent to the lab and that decision is the reason I am still here.

A few days later the phone call came and my mum was told it was cancer. It was a shock to us because I was otherwise a normal healthy four year old who had so much energy and who likes nothing more than playing with my mates.

Within a day of getting the news, my mum had me over to see the Oncologist, Dr Ken Wyatt. I had to go through bone marrow testing, ultrasounds and x-rays. After all the testing Dr Ken said that I had localized malignant histiocytic sarcoma and because I had dirty margins around the lump I would need chemotherapy. At least the tumour hadn’t spread to other organs.

Every three weeks I would go and see Dr Ken for my chemotherapy. I never wanted to be going but my mum said I would have to do as I was told. They were always nice to me but I didn’t like being poked and prodded all the time. Whilst I was having my chemotherapy it was business as usual. I had no sickness from it and I carried on as normal. At home I would race around with my mates and I never felt sick. I did get a couple of infections after the first two sessions which meant I had to get shaved for intravenous antibiotics, but it was something I just had to put up with.
After my course of chemotherapy had finished, I would go and see Dr Ken every two months for a check-up. I’d try to get out of going for these check-ups and I had to be carried up the stairs because I would just lock my legs and wouldn’t move. After the examination was over I would relax and lick Dr Ken on the hand and off we go until next time. With each visit giving us good news it was quite a milestone to reach the two year mark. Eighty percent of dogs with my type of cancer die within two years as it is very aggressive.  A couple of years ago, I even sent a DNA sample for a cancer research program in the United Kingdom, as they were looking for dogs with histiocytic sarcoma. I hope that my participation might save other dogs in the future.

I am one of the lucky ones and I am still here because my mum had my lump sent to the laboratory for analysis. If she hadn’t, I wouldn’t be here today as without treatment I might have only lasted a couple of months.. I hope all my mates out there will have parents that do the same. If a vet ever tells you there is nothing to worry about when a lump is removed, always ask for it to be sent off to the lab for conformation. Vets are human and mistakes can happen. Never delay in getting lumps checked as delays can be the difference between life and death.

I am lucky that I have been given the chance to have many more years ahead of me. Dr Ken and his staff knew exactly what I needed. Even though I don’t like going there my mum said it is for my own good. If there was any changes, they would be picked up quick and treated.

Now I can spend my days playing with my mates, although it is hard to find a playmate who can keep up with me. They always run out of steam before I do. My brother Farrell is also teaching me how to garden and help bring in the washing. My mum is not happy about this. I also do fundraising events for my mates in rescue shelters, which is where I came from.. I sit with my tin and get lots of pats and turn on the charm so my tins fills up. I am a big ham at it these days as I have been doing it for years. At least now I should be around for years enjoying life, thanks to Dr Ken. He gave me a second chance. 

Frodo
** Sadly Frodo passed away on 20 April 2014 as a result of Vinca poisoning (also known as periwinkle). He survived cancer 4.5yrs and was cancer free when he passed.

Supplied by Caninecancer.org.au the Australian Canine Cancer website. The aim of this site is to provide owners with one point where they can find relevant information about cancer in their canine companions.

We would like to thank Lisa for a great article on canine caner. If you have any questions you can use the link to go to their website. Lisa is very passionate about Vinca poisoning, please protect your dogs.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

How Do You Identify A Problematic Dog?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about How do you identify a problematic dog.

Our guest blogger today is Mary Rose of Dogs World, where she is a Dog Care and Behavior Coach.

Make a list of all your dog’s problematic behaviours and what your thoughts and feelings are about them.
This will help you to become more aware and help you to achieve clarification about the problems you and your dog are facing and start to locate an identifiable pattern to the perceived problematic behaviours.
Follow these steps:-

A)      Identify your ambitions.
Write down next to each problem what your ambitions are to resolve the problem and what outcome you would like to achieve.
This is the key to beginning to adopt a more positive mindset and attitude that there is an achievable end goal in sight.

B)      Identify how health & behaviour can be linked.
List down all of your dogs medical history including and injuries, operations and prescribed medication your dog may have received including the dates of the last vaccinations and flea/and worm treatments.
Often changes in behaviour can occur after medication or treatments have been administered or can be linked to some pain or imbalance somewhere inside of your dog.

C)      Identify current diet & feeding patterns.
Make a list of all the foods your dog consumes including any human foods you feed it or pet treats from the pet shop.
Read the ingredient labels and begin to educate yourself on what these ingredients actually are as they often use technical names or proper names to disguise ingredients. (Like `derivatives` – means a copy of!)
Chances are when you learn what is in most pet foods you will begin to see why they are causing imbalances to your dog’s internal system.

D)      Identify patterns and triggers in your dog’s immediate environment.
Make a diary of when the problem behaviours occur and what is happening in the current environment when it happens.
Also note down what you were doing and feeling at the time: This will help you to identify common triggers and patterns to the behaviours your dog is showing and how you respond to them.

E)      Treat the cause, not the effect.
Problematic behaviour in animals usually stems from an underlying imbalance in the immune or nervous systems and these imbalances can be treated very effectively with natural diets and treatments.

F)      Learn how to communicate with your dog effectively.
Understand that your dog’s problematic behaviour can often be that they are trying to communicate to you that one or some of their needs are not being met.
They cannot speak or understand human language, (only pick up on the tonatality of your voice- the way you say it) they use various forms of behaviours & body language to communicate to you how they are feeling.

G)      Animals often mirror our own deep seated problems.
If you have a dog who is fearful and nervous, check into see what you are feeling nervous or fearful about in life.
If your dog is aggressive maybe you are dealing with aggression issues in your own life, either, with yourself, your family members or a work situation.
If your dog starts to urinate or defecate in your house then it could mean a change of diet is needed or that you are carrying deep seated sadness, guilt or grief. (Or: just marking territory in a new/ other house!)
Dog & Owner coaching deals with the owners’ thoughts, emotions and feelings and offers you ways to become a calm confident and natural leader that you dog will look up to and respect naturally.

Thank you Mary Rose for a very insightful article.

Mary Rose is a CiDBT Qualified Dog Behaviourist & Coach
for & on behalf of Just Dogs World
T: 01572 717001
M: 07976 767727
E: maryrose@justdogsworld.com
W: www.justdogsworld.com
T: @JustDogsWorld

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/