Top Hacks and Tips for Bathing Your Dog

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you.

Today’s session is about:

Top Hacks and Tips for Bathing Your Dog

Do you or your dog get nervous when it is time for a bath? Some dogs adjust better than others, but here are a few ways that you can make bath time more pleasant for the both of you.

If you have a puppy, it is a good idea to get her used to bathing as soon as possible. This will help your dog to avoid getting negative associations to bathing. This will help you to have less trouble later.

To convince your dog that a bathtub is a happy place, try placing a delicious treat or a favorite toy in the tub and let your dog find it. The idea is to make the idea of jumping in and out of the tub a game. You can let your dog watch you toss it in the tub and then let the dog go after it. Give her another treat while she is in there to encourage her to stay in the tub. Try doing this 5 or 6 times, a few days a week. To get her used to the idea of running water, you can have warm water trickling from the faucet while you are doing it.

Be sure to place a rubber mat at the bottom of the tub so she won’t slide around when jumping in and out. If your tub is too tall for your dog to jump in and out of, try putting some non-skid steps in front of your tub. It is a better idea to get your dog to get into the tub voluntarily than for you to have to pick her up.

It is a good idea to pay attention to your own voice and body language. If you want your dog to be relaxed and calm during bathing, you will need to be the same way. When bath time approaches, approach him calmly and speak quietly.

Place cotton balls in your dog’s ears to keep the water out. This is important because an infection can develop if water remains in the ears. Another thing you can do is put a shower cap on their head to keep the water out.

It is a good idea to have several small treats available if your dog isn’t keen on the idea of getting a bath. You can give him one every few seconds while you are working on him. This rewards your dog for going along with an activity he is not crazy about.

Another idea is to smear a spoonful of peanut butter on the side of the tub, so that he will stay busy licking it off when you are washing him.

Be sure to set out all of your supplies ahead of time, in easy reach. This will make sure that you aren’t having to wrestle with your dog when you are trying to grab a towel.

Before giving your dog a bath, brush him thoroughly to keep the hair from clogging your drain. It is a good idea to have a handheld shower attachment to wash your dog, turned to the gentle setting. Use less dog shampoo than you think you might need and rinse more than you think you might need to. Conditioner is unnecessary.

Be sure to bathe him in lukewarm water, so you won’t shock your dog or burn their skin. Turn off the water supply while you shampoo your dog, as running water tends to makes dogs nervous. Praise him throughout the entire bath, while you massage his body as gently as possible.

If you wash your dog’s head, you should do so with a tearless puppy shampoo. If you don’t you will burn your dog’s eyes, teaching him that bath time is not all it is cracked up to be. Bath time softens the dog’s nails. This means that afterward is a good time to cut them.

If you really want to have a happy pooch, buy a towel warmer. Having a nice, warm towel to wrap around your dog may prevent him from shaking and trying to dry off on the nearest sofa.

After you dry her off, try placing her in her crate with a food-dispensing chew toy afterward. This will keep her busy and happy, while keeping your house from becoming dampened in the process.

Bio: John Alfonso is a writer and blogger for FlexPetz Blog and writes about dog behaviors, technology and nutrition

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

Daisy laying in the grass

Reiki For Dogs

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about Reiki.

When I tell people that I practice Reiki, most get a questioning look on their face. People’s responses range from a simple “I don’t know what that is” to the more comical “Well you can come Rake-y my yard!” And believe me, I laugh with them.
Reiki, in the simplest term, is an ancient Japanese energy healing technique. “Rei” means “Divine” and “Ki” means “Life Energy”. What happens during a session is that I place my hands on certain spots of the body of the animal or person I am working on, and call on the Earth’s energy to come flow through my body (like a conduit) and out of my hands. The energy then flows where the body needs it the most.
Reiki has many benefits: reduces stress, promotes relaxation, lowers blood pressure, accelerates the body’s self-healing abilities, helps in pain relief, helps with acute injuries and chronic issues, supports the immune system and aids in better sleep.
Now, I will not say that Reiki alone will cure all. However, you WILL hear me say that it works well in conjunction with other modalities. It helps to get everything kick-started and maintain things.
While Reiki is not considered main stream, it IS becoming more recognized and accepted. One only has to believe in the intent for it to work.
Reiki can be performed by anyone who has been trained by a Reiki Master. There are 3 degrees:

1st Degree – you learn how to heal on a physically level
2nd Degree – you learn how to heal on a mental and emotional level, and learn how to perform
distant (or absentee) healing.
3rd Degree – Master level. You learn to heal on a spiritual level, make Reiki a way of life, and
you have the ability to teach others.

Many people will take the 1st and 2nd degree and then stop, not continuing on to the Master level. That is ok. Teaching isn’t everyone’s forte and one can be a successful Reiki practitioner without being a Master.

Thank you so much for allowing me to tell you about what I love to do!

If anyone is interested in having a Reiki session for themselves or their pet(s), or, if you have any questions, please visit my website: www.healingsoulsreiki.com, or you can email me at kerry@healingsoulsreiki.com.

Take care and Blessed Be!

Thank you Kerry for such a great and informing article.

Healing Souls Reiki

Kerry Morony has been a practicing Reiki Master since 2010 and also has been a certified veterinary technician for the past 15 years. She delights in helping all souls, human and animal, with her favorite being horses.

Kerry literally goes the extra mile for her clients, traveling all over the state of New Jersey, including parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.

Kerry is conveniently located in the South Jersey area.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

Bartley’s For Dogs, Not Your Average Pet Supply Store

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about Bartley’s For Dogs, not your average pet supply store!

This is Jason from Bartley’s For Dogs online store, telling the story  of how Bartley’s got started.

Four years ago, I adopted Bartley, a Dachshund Jack Russell Terrier puppy, from a rescue group in Oklahoma. Without exaggeration, I can say that Bartley changed my life, and opened my eyes to the wonderful life of having a dog. From living in New York City to moving out to San Francisco, I cannot imagine these past four years without him by my side.

Bartley

But all of this almost didn’t happen. Bartley was part of a litter of puppies that were left, along with their mother, at a high-kill shelter. The overcrowded municipal shelter didn’t have the time, space, manpower or money to care for these pups, and it was only a matter of time before they would end up on the euthanasia list. However, thanks to a local rescue group, the dogs were saved and all found loving homes.

Sadly, as many of us know, so many other dogs don’t get rescued and their stories don’t have a happy ending. An estimated 3-4 million dogs are killed in shelters every year. Think about that, 3-4 million dogs. Every year. And these are dogs of every age, breed and ability level.

It’s because of the tireless work of rescue groups that many others, including Bartley, are saved. Most rescue groups are run by volunteers with small budgets and high expenses. In the fight to save every dog, these groups need help. And that is how the idea for Bartley’s was born.

Bartley’s is an online shop that sells high quality dog toys, treats and accessories. We also sell gifts for humans who love their dogs, like magnets, notebooks and tote bags. We feature respected name brands like Zuke’s, West Paw and Kong with an emphasis on goods made in the U.S.A. Our prices are always competitive to other dog shops.

But the best part about Bartley’s? Bartley’s partners with rescue groups across the country to help sponsor dogs in need. Proceeds from every single purchase go directly towards helping a specific dog and rescue group. When you purchase a product, you receive a unique code that allows you to see pictures and stories of the dog you helped save online. By purchasing a toy or treat for your dog (or even a gift for yourself!), you are helping save another dog’s life. It’s that easy.

Without a doubt, our favorite part of starting Bartley’s has been hearing the “happy ending” stories of dogs we’ve helped. And it’s all because of our amazing customers we’ve been able to partner with rescue groups to sponsor these dogs and give them a new beginning.

Past sponsorships include the cute Yorkie in Florida who was abandoned by her family and found with mange, a respiratory infection, and malnutrition. The rescue group took her in and helped get her healthy and up for adoption. There was also the faithful Lab mix in Georgia who was found with no food and limited water sitting beside his owner, who had passed away three weeks prior. The rescue group there taught him how to play again, and helped him gain weight and undergo modified fast kill heartworm treatment. Another example is the Collie mix in Virginia who came to the rescue group as a scared and abandoned puppy. She’s since been adopted and is taking strides to become a more brave and friendly dog.

We love hearing about these success stories and we love helping the rescue groups do the tough job of providing this care. Little by little, dog by dog, together we can make a difference and work to ensure every dog gets their happy ending.

Thank you Jason  for a great article. Thank you for helping dogs and making dog rescue personal! Please visit Bartley’s at their web site and like their Facebook page www.facebook.com/bartleysfordogs . If you want to contact Bartley’s here is their email: info@bartleysfordogs.com

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

Canine Cancer

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about Canine Cancer.
This article is written by Lisa at Canine Cancer .org in Australia.
My name is Frodo and I am an eight year old cancer survivor. I have recently passed my four year cancer free period, so it’s looking pretty good for me now to have a normal life expectancy.

One morning four years ago, I woke up with a huge egg-like lump on my head near my ear. At first my mum thought I had bumped my head but she took me straight to the vet. He thought it was a cyst at first and when he tried to drain it nothing came out. He said he would have to operate to remove the lump.

When my mum came to pick me up after the operation the vet old her it was nothing to worry about and he got it all. Lucky for me my mum asked for it to be sent to the lab and that decision is the reason I am still here.

A few days later the phone call came and my mum was told it was cancer. It was a shock to us because I was otherwise a normal healthy four year old who had so much energy and who likes nothing more than playing with my mates.

Within a day of getting the news, my mum had me over to see the Oncologist, Dr Ken Wyatt. I had to go through bone marrow testing, ultrasounds and x-rays. After all the testing Dr Ken said that I had localized malignant histiocytic sarcoma and because I had dirty margins around the lump I would need chemotherapy. At least the tumour hadn’t spread to other organs.

Every three weeks I would go and see Dr Ken for my chemotherapy. I never wanted to be going but my mum said I would have to do as I was told. They were always nice to me but I didn’t like being poked and prodded all the time. Whilst I was having my chemotherapy it was business as usual. I had no sickness from it and I carried on as normal. At home I would race around with my mates and I never felt sick. I did get a couple of infections after the first two sessions which meant I had to get shaved for intravenous antibiotics, but it was something I just had to put up with.
After my course of chemotherapy had finished, I would go and see Dr Ken every two months for a check-up. I’d try to get out of going for these check-ups and I had to be carried up the stairs because I would just lock my legs and wouldn’t move. After the examination was over I would relax and lick Dr Ken on the hand and off we go until next time. With each visit giving us good news it was quite a milestone to reach the two year mark. Eighty percent of dogs with my type of cancer die within two years as it is very aggressive.  A couple of years ago, I even sent a DNA sample for a cancer research program in the United Kingdom, as they were looking for dogs with histiocytic sarcoma. I hope that my participation might save other dogs in the future.

I am one of the lucky ones and I am still here because my mum had my lump sent to the laboratory for analysis. If she hadn’t, I wouldn’t be here today as without treatment I might have only lasted a couple of months.. I hope all my mates out there will have parents that do the same. If a vet ever tells you there is nothing to worry about when a lump is removed, always ask for it to be sent off to the lab for conformation. Vets are human and mistakes can happen. Never delay in getting lumps checked as delays can be the difference between life and death.

I am lucky that I have been given the chance to have many more years ahead of me. Dr Ken and his staff knew exactly what I needed. Even though I don’t like going there my mum said it is for my own good. If there was any changes, they would be picked up quick and treated.

Now I can spend my days playing with my mates, although it is hard to find a playmate who can keep up with me. They always run out of steam before I do. My brother Farrell is also teaching me how to garden and help bring in the washing. My mum is not happy about this. I also do fundraising events for my mates in rescue shelters, which is where I came from.. I sit with my tin and get lots of pats and turn on the charm so my tins fills up. I am a big ham at it these days as I have been doing it for years. At least now I should be around for years enjoying life, thanks to Dr Ken. He gave me a second chance. 

Frodo
** Sadly Frodo passed away on 20 April 2014 as a result of Vinca poisoning (also known as periwinkle). He survived cancer 4.5yrs and was cancer free when he passed.

Supplied by Caninecancer.org.au the Australian Canine Cancer website. The aim of this site is to provide owners with one point where they can find relevant information about cancer in their canine companions.

We would like to thank Lisa for a great article on canine caner. If you have any questions you can use the link to go to their website. Lisa is very passionate about Vinca poisoning, please protect your dogs.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

How Do You Identify A Problematic Dog?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about How do you identify a problematic dog.

Our guest blogger today is Mary Rose of Dogs World, where she is a Dog Care and Behavior Coach.

Make a list of all your dog’s problematic behaviours and what your thoughts and feelings are about them.
This will help you to become more aware and help you to achieve clarification about the problems you and your dog are facing and start to locate an identifiable pattern to the perceived problematic behaviours.
Follow these steps:-

A)      Identify your ambitions.
Write down next to each problem what your ambitions are to resolve the problem and what outcome you would like to achieve.
This is the key to beginning to adopt a more positive mindset and attitude that there is an achievable end goal in sight.

B)      Identify how health & behaviour can be linked.
List down all of your dogs medical history including and injuries, operations and prescribed medication your dog may have received including the dates of the last vaccinations and flea/and worm treatments.
Often changes in behaviour can occur after medication or treatments have been administered or can be linked to some pain or imbalance somewhere inside of your dog.

C)      Identify current diet & feeding patterns.
Make a list of all the foods your dog consumes including any human foods you feed it or pet treats from the pet shop.
Read the ingredient labels and begin to educate yourself on what these ingredients actually are as they often use technical names or proper names to disguise ingredients. (Like `derivatives` – means a copy of!)
Chances are when you learn what is in most pet foods you will begin to see why they are causing imbalances to your dog’s internal system.

D)      Identify patterns and triggers in your dog’s immediate environment.
Make a diary of when the problem behaviours occur and what is happening in the current environment when it happens.
Also note down what you were doing and feeling at the time: This will help you to identify common triggers and patterns to the behaviours your dog is showing and how you respond to them.

E)      Treat the cause, not the effect.
Problematic behaviour in animals usually stems from an underlying imbalance in the immune or nervous systems and these imbalances can be treated very effectively with natural diets and treatments.

F)      Learn how to communicate with your dog effectively.
Understand that your dog’s problematic behaviour can often be that they are trying to communicate to you that one or some of their needs are not being met.
They cannot speak or understand human language, (only pick up on the tonatality of your voice- the way you say it) they use various forms of behaviours & body language to communicate to you how they are feeling.

G)      Animals often mirror our own deep seated problems.
If you have a dog who is fearful and nervous, check into see what you are feeling nervous or fearful about in life.
If your dog is aggressive maybe you are dealing with aggression issues in your own life, either, with yourself, your family members or a work situation.
If your dog starts to urinate or defecate in your house then it could mean a change of diet is needed or that you are carrying deep seated sadness, guilt or grief. (Or: just marking territory in a new/ other house!)
Dog & Owner coaching deals with the owners’ thoughts, emotions and feelings and offers you ways to become a calm confident and natural leader that you dog will look up to and respect naturally.

Thank you Mary Rose for a very insightful article.

Mary Rose is a CiDBT Qualified Dog Behaviourist & Coach
for & on behalf of Just Dogs World
T: 01572 717001
M: 07976 767727
E: maryrose@justdogsworld.com
W: www.justdogsworld.com
T: @JustDogsWorld

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

Spring Has Sprung!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about protecting your dogs while you get your yard in shape for the summer.

It’s that time of the year again and as everyone is getting their yards into shape for the summer, but don’t forget that many of the things that we may want to do to our yards maybe harmful to our dogs. While we can’t make our yards 100% safe for our dogs, we can limit the harmful things that we put in them. One of the main things people do to make their yards look nice is to weed and mulch the flower beds. Fertilizers, pesticides and mulch are all poisonous to dogs and cats.

Fertilizers, pesticides, and weed killers that are commonly used, all are poisonous to cats and dogs.  While these products are designed to do different things in the yard, they all affect your pet the same way… BADLY! The chemicals used in these products are highly poisonous and will affect your pets nervous system. Care should be taken to keep these away from pets and pets away from them. Even the “natural” products are dangerous to your pets health (these are made from the Chrysanthemum flower). . Your best bet is to keep all garden products away from your pets.

 

Regardless of which products your pet gets into, the effects on them will be the same. The above chemicals will affect your pets nervous system. They disrupt the nervous system and can cause your pet to die. Some signs and symptoms to watch for, is watering of the eyes, excessive salivation, uncontrolled urination. Or the direct opposite, dry eyes, hot dry skin, dry mouth, flushed skin, red gums and eyes, the inability to urinate.  Your pet may seize (shake uncontrollably, urinate and become unconscious), stop breathing and ultimately die. While there are antidotes and medications that can help your pet and possibly control these symptoms, they require Interveinous (IV),  injection or infusion medications. That means you need to get your pet to the vets as soon as you see any signs and symptoms.

While doing research for this article, I looked at the different types of mulch that is readily available to put in our yard’s flower beds. The popular mulches include; wood mulch both dyed and not dyed, rubber mulch, licorice root mulch, cocoa shell mulch and compost mulch. Of all the mulches, natural composted yard waste is the safest for your pet. The wood mulch, especially the dyed mulch can be poisonous to your pets. The rubber mulch is not digestible and could cause an obstruction in the digestive tract. The licorice mulch can be poisonous to your pet, I was not able to find any info that said it was safe, with any processed mulch, we don’t know exactly what chemicals are used to process it, so I always error on the side of caution and consider it poisonous until proven safe. Cocoa mulch is the shell that is left over from the production of chocolate, so besides chocolate being poisonous, the shells from the cocoa seeds are dangerous, if ingested they could cause blockages and lacerations in the digestive tract.

So in conclusion, while it is exciting to feel the warm weather of spring and seeing the plants start to bud and bloom, remember that when using products to clean up your yard, be careful. Our dogs and cats are smaller than us and poisons will affect them sooner and from smaller amounts and shorter exposure times. Always try to use natural products, but beware, some “natural” products are also poisonous. Bottom line, be careful, watch your pet closely and do your best to provide a safe environment for both you and your pets. Enjoy the transformation of spring and enjoy your summer.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

 

Hello, Nice To Meet You.

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about how to introduce a new dog to your pack. We are going to talk about properly introducing a new dog to your pack, then we are going to make sure you keep your pack and your new dog safe while integrating your new dog in the pack.

Okay, you just adopted a new dog or you have a new foster, either way, you need to introduce the dog to your pack. The one thing you absolutely do not want to do is bring spike home and bring him inside to show your new pack. This would be a disaster.

What you need to do is make the introduction on neutral ground where both your pack and Spike will meet as equals. Take spike for a walk when you get him home. Have someone else take your pack out for a walk as well. While out on a walk, on neutral ground, let the dogs meet. Allow them to sniff each other and greet each other in a normal way. The best greeting is for dogs to greet each other by sniffing each other’s butts. This is non confrontational and socially acceptable (in the dog world).

Pack walk 7-2010 (1)

If Spike or your dogs bark at each other while approaching the greeting, immediately tell that dog NO! Then turn around and walk the other way. Continue to walk away until the dog stops barking. Then when the dog is relaxed, walk toward the other dog or dogs again. If the barking starts again, repeat the same process. This should only take a few types before the dogs understand it is not ok to bark when meeting other dogs.

You may want to keep the greeting short and continue walking separately and then meet up again in a few minutes making sure that the greetings stay pleasant. After the greeting take the leashes of your pack and walk them and spike together. Walk the pack with spike for a little bit to allow them to get used to each other.

Daisy and Gunner

When you get home make sure you enter your home first to establish and reinforce your position as alpha leader to both spike and your pack. Once in the house you want to make sure you are always with Spike when he is around your pack. You want to be extra observant, so you can stop any problems before they become a problem. You need to allow Spike to find his place within the pack, until that place is defined, Spike needs to be crated at night and crated anytime you are not home. This is a very important point, because the life of Spike and or the life of one of your pack could be saved by doing this. The last thing you want to do is go out for the day leaving all the dogs loose in your home only to come back and find one or more dogs severely injured or even dead because they got into a fight and no one was able to stop it.

It’s important to establish yourself as Alpha leader and establish Spikes place within the pack. When you feed your dogs, have them all sit and wait for you to place their food down. Then you have them “wait” until you say it is ok to eat. When you feed your dogs, make sure you feed them in order of their pack rank (unless you make them all wait until all the food is down, then you let them eat all at once), make sure Spike is fed last. Whenever you go through a door, make sure you go first and then allow Spike. You are the Alpha, so as a pack leader, you have the privilege of eating first and eating the prime pieces of food, you get to sit and lay on the softest and best places. Since you are the leader the rest of the pack follows, so therefore you must go first. Working with Spike and teaching him tricks is also a great way to help establish and reinforce your role as Alpha. One thing that you absolutely should not due is have Spike sleep in your bed. If you let Spike sleep in your bed as soon as he is brought into the house, you are elevating Spike to the level of your pack and to your level as Alpha leader. Spike needs to settle into the pack, establish his spot and then learn his way, before he can have special privileges.

Once Spike knows his position in the pack and sees you as the Alpha pack leader, you can slowly start giving Spike the privileges that the rest of the pack has. These can be, laying or sitting on the furniture, laying in bed while you are watching TV. The very last privilege should be, being allowed to sleep in bed.

The last thing that you want is Spike to challenge you for the Alpha position because you gave him bed privileges too soon.

We hope this helps you with introducing new members to your pack. We want every pack to be happy. Tell us your experiences, so that other can learn.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/