Memorializing Your Pet

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us, we are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about creating a memorial for your pet that has passed.
Today Dale Wescott of Zone 13 Tattoo and Piercing Studio, is our guest writer today talking a bout “how one can properly memorialize their pet with a tattoo”.

One of the most difficult questions an artist is confronted with…how to memorialize the loss of a pet. The difficultly often begins with most artists reflecting upon the relationships with their own pets. Despite popular stigmas, many of us in the tattoo industry are animal lovers, and have forged a deep love of our four-legged friends. They are not pets; they are family. There is nothing more rewarding, or satisfying then our companions greeting us after a long-day at work.

The next step is often the most crucial; ensuring the client has processed their grief completely, and is not acting in the “heat of the moment.” We as artists must to choose our words carefully, while offering the best suggestions. As an artist, we have an obligation to render the best possible creation for our clients. We want to explore all options to ensure the individual’s vision is mastered. I like to sit-down and get to know the person and the relationship they shared with their pet. Although this often evokes emotion, it is the best possible way to develop a concept for a tattoo. We explain to the potential client, that the process of tattooing is permanent and that our wish is to make this a celebration of life instead of a spur of the moment mistake that will last a life time. I feel it better to offer many a suggestion while allowing the client to ponder concepts, rather than live in the “would’ve, could’ve, should’ve.”

As for ideas, we are often asked, what is the best way to memorialize the loss of a pet? This is specific to the individual. We offer suggestions and work off of your ideas. That said, I feel it best that the client has thought the decision to get a tattoo through and has a “rough” idea of the final rendition. Here are some ideas I feel pay our departed friends homage:

Portraits: This is a fantastic tribute, and completely embodies the memory of their friend. A portrait can be either done realistic or of the animated version, and captures a moment in time. The only limitations in realistic portraits are, body placement, and direction of the pose. A portrait needs to be placed on a flat surface as not to distort the picture, and needs to face in the proper direction to flow with the body’s anatomy. When selecting an artist for a portrait, demand to view their work, and ask if they are comfortable working within this medium. There is nothing more disheartening than seeing a portrait that is anything less than perfection. Far too often, many an inexperienced artist will enter into this realm without the ability to “nail it.”
A favorite toy: The relationship between our friend and their buddy is nothing less than amazing. Through their life, we experience joy and laughter as they share their daily adventures with that special toy.
Flowers that represent their name: I included this because it’s an option that allows the wearer to know what the meaning is, without requiring an explanation to others.
Script: I included this last for personal reasons. It is my opinion this does not completely embody the essence of a pet. Opinions aside, this is another option available to the client.
Bottom line, we are entrusted with an opportunity to share in the grief-process, assist in the healing process and hopefully deliver some degree of closure. Long after a client has left the studio, we remember their story and hope we have assisted in capturing the client’s vision while bringing them peace.

As for the selection of an artist, don’t be fearful to ask questions. In addition, view their portfolio and ask to preview the work prior to receiving the tattoo. If you wish changes to the drawing, discuss these with the artist in advance of your appointment. Finally, never let cost be a consideration in the selection of an artist. As I’ve stated before, the art of tattooing is permanent. Despite what reality television has promoted, the removal process is painful, expensive and often leaves scaring. Also noteworthy, be hesitant of an artist that offers to do the tattoo on the spot; there is good reason an accomplished artist requires an appointment.

I hope this advice was helpful. We at ZONE 13 Tattoo wish you well and offer our sincere condolences for your loss. As always, we are here to assist you in your time of loss, and to celebrate in your pet’s life.

Thank you Dale for a great article and one that is near & dear to our own hearts. We are currently considering a memorial tattoo to one of our own departed pack members. It’s over a year since our Duchess passed  and we are still contemplating  our memorial.

For more information on Zone 13 Tattoo and Piercing please visit them at

10 Superior Way, Deptford, NJ 08096
856-848-5000 Email: Zone13Tattoo@yahoo.com
Web site: http://zone13tattoo.net

Zone 13 Tattoo and Piercing
Zone 13 Tattoo and Piercing

 

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

Muffin’s Halo Update

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about Muffin’s Halo.


Muffin’s Halo
Makes “Top 10 Pet Inventions” on Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet Show.
Device that is helping blind dogs globally lead a bump-free life.

 

Muffin
Tuesday, October 7th 2014 — Daily Planet – Discovery Channel’s long-running primetime science magazine show aired its segment “Top 10 Pet Inventions” and ranked Muffin’s Halo for Blind Dog in 7th position!

Co-hosts Dan Riskin and Ziya Tong reported about this blind dog product that is navigating multitudes of furry impaired ones across the globe, “Genuinely for a good cause.  Blind pups need not worry about what may be in their paths as Muffin’s Halo will protect them.  A special harness with light wire tubing and cushioning makes sure any blow is soft.”

Muffin’s Halo for Blind Dogs ® is a 3 piece must-have device that helps blind dogs of any size transition to become familiar with existing or new surroundings quickly. It starts as a harness that is wrapped snuggly around a dog’s neck and torso, which makes them feel cuddled and less anxious. The halo which is attached to the wing is fastened to the neck of the harness (light weight and comfortable). The halo acts as a buffer to safeguard a blind dog’s head, nose, face and shoulders from bumping into hard surfaces. When the halo confronts an obstruction, it sends a signal to the dog and they automatically go in a different direction. They catch on very fast and it is truly amazing to watch their confidence level rise as they feel free to explore again bump-free. Muffin’s Halo does not hinder a dog’s normal daily activity (they can eat, drink, sleep and play with it on) and it gives them their confidence back!

Muffin’s Halo comes in different styles and colors to bring forth awareness for blind dogs.  The Angel Wings signifies “protection and guidance”.  The Quarterback style symbolizes “star of the team who has his blind-side covered” and the Butterfly Wings means freedom to “fly” again.

Canine blindness can be caused by several factors such as: cataracts, glaucoma, SARDS, corneal problems, cancer, trauma, retinal diseases, diabetes and/or genetics.

Los Angeles resident, Silvie Bordeaux invented  Muffin’s Halo out of the love and devotion for Muffin Bordeaux, her 14 year old toy poodle who lost his sight several years ago due to cataracts.  Muffin began bumping into walls, fell down the stairs and became depressed and immobile, as he attempted to transition. Silvie was heartbroken and determined to find a solution for her beloved blind dog.  After doing some extensive research, she realized there was a great need for products to aid blind dogs, so she created this device for him and is dedicated to helping blind/visually impaired dogs and their caring owners.  Today, this critically acclaimed blind dog product that holds two patents offering blind dogs head protection, is global and has been featured all over the news and the recipient of many awards.  It is highly recommended by Animal Ophthalmologists and veterinarians worldwide.

Here is video link to the Muffin’s Halo story:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njNCKXyojUY

For more information, please visit www.muffinshalo.com.  To contact Inventor/Founder Silvie Bordeaux, please email Muffinshalo@aol.com or call 818.943.9673.
Silvie Bordeaux is also founder of non-profit organization, “Second Chances For Blind Dogs” whose mission is to provide blind dogs in shelters/rescues with a Muffin’s Halo to help them navigate into forever homes and to educate the public on how to care for blind dogs. www.secondchancesforblinddogs.org

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

The Carriage Horse Debate In New York City

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about The Carriage Horses in New York City.
New Yorker has always been at the forefront of important social issues — pushing for progress instead of holding on to the antiquated past.

But despite our history as a leading city for progressive change, whenever a new idea is brought forward in the name of improving the lives of New Yorkers there are still those who fight against progress in the name of “this is how we’ve always done it.”

Think back to 2003, when New York City banned smoking in bars and restaurants. While that measure was being debated, a sizeable percentage of New Yorkers predicted nothing short of economic Armageddon. They argued that our city’s hospitality industry would be destroyed and thousands of people would lose their jobs. Obviously, the end result of the smoking ban could not be further from that imagined result.

Bars and restaurants are still wildly successful and we have seen cities, states and even countries follow our lead. Today, it’s regarded as one of the most successful public health initiatives in our city’s history.
And now, eleven short years later, we find ourselves in a similar debate, this time over the future of the carriage horse industry. We have seen the horse carriage issue rocket to the forefront of the New York political discussion and for good reason – horses have been killed or severely injured while on the job, and drivers have been caught mistreating their animals. Tourists have been sent to the hospital with broken bones, and local residents have sustained property damage.

While I understand the romanticism and nostalgia of a ride through Central Park, the argument of tradition is no excuse for the continued inhumane treatment of carriage horses that are forced to live nose-to-tailpipe lives while navigating dangerous midtown traffic.

But we also hear that we can’t rid the horse carriages from New York streets because it will cost jobs. Everyone agrees that no one should lose their jobs as we transition carriage horse off of our streets. Thankfully, there’s a realistic, economically viable, safe and humane alternative that will both remove the horses from the streets and allow all drivers to keep their jobs.

Replacing horse-drawn carriages with new, safe, humane antique electric vehicles is a plan that is supported by Mayor de Blasio and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. Recently, NYCLASS unveiled a prototype for this new electric “Horseless eCarriage.” And it will allow us to finally retire the horses to loving adoption homes, in partnership with the ASPCA, Humane Society of the United States, and many other organizations that have all committed to providing lifetime care for every single carriage horse when the industry comes to an end.

The prototype, unveiled to wide fanfare at the New York Auto Show, will provide a realistic compromise for those who want to ensure carriage drivers keep their jobs while also putting an end to the inhumanity associated with the carriage horse trade. It’s a solution that works for all New Yorkers – two legged and four legged.

Horse drawn carriages simply do not fit in an urban environment like New York City. These streets are already dangerous for pedestrians and drivers and they become even worse when a horse drawn carriage is brought into the mix.

Mayor de Blasio has strongly confirmed his commitment to end the carriage horse industry in New York. And we are confident in the Mayor’s commitment. Like the mayor, we are not looking to put hardworking New Yorkers out of work. We’re looking to make progress by creating a new industry – one that respects the rights of both people and animals.

Animals advocates can help – if you live in NYC, write a quick letter to your Council Member at www.nyclass.org/citycouncil. If you live outside the city, sign the petition at StopHorseAbuse.com

Allie Feldman
Executive Director
NYCLASS
212-626-6991
allief@nyclass.org
www.nyclass.org
facebook.com/stophorseabuse
twitter @nyclass

Canine Cancer

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.
Today’s session is about Canine Cancer.
This article is written by Lisa at Canine Cancer .org in Australia.
My name is Frodo and I am an eight year old cancer survivor. I have recently passed my four year cancer free period, so it’s looking pretty good for me now to have a normal life expectancy.

One morning four years ago, I woke up with a huge egg-like lump on my head near my ear. At first my mum thought I had bumped my head but she took me straight to the vet. He thought it was a cyst at first and when he tried to drain it nothing came out. He said he would have to operate to remove the lump.

When my mum came to pick me up after the operation the vet old her it was nothing to worry about and he got it all. Lucky for me my mum asked for it to be sent to the lab and that decision is the reason I am still here.

A few days later the phone call came and my mum was told it was cancer. It was a shock to us because I was otherwise a normal healthy four year old who had so much energy and who likes nothing more than playing with my mates.

Within a day of getting the news, my mum had me over to see the Oncologist, Dr Ken Wyatt. I had to go through bone marrow testing, ultrasounds and x-rays. After all the testing Dr Ken said that I had localized malignant histiocytic sarcoma and because I had dirty margins around the lump I would need chemotherapy. At least the tumour hadn’t spread to other organs.

Every three weeks I would go and see Dr Ken for my chemotherapy. I never wanted to be going but my mum said I would have to do as I was told. They were always nice to me but I didn’t like being poked and prodded all the time. Whilst I was having my chemotherapy it was business as usual. I had no sickness from it and I carried on as normal. At home I would race around with my mates and I never felt sick. I did get a couple of infections after the first two sessions which meant I had to get shaved for intravenous antibiotics, but it was something I just had to put up with.
After my course of chemotherapy had finished, I would go and see Dr Ken every two months for a check-up. I’d try to get out of going for these check-ups and I had to be carried up the stairs because I would just lock my legs and wouldn’t move. After the examination was over I would relax and lick Dr Ken on the hand and off we go until next time. With each visit giving us good news it was quite a milestone to reach the two year mark. Eighty percent of dogs with my type of cancer die within two years as it is very aggressive.  A couple of years ago, I even sent a DNA sample for a cancer research program in the United Kingdom, as they were looking for dogs with histiocytic sarcoma. I hope that my participation might save other dogs in the future.

I am one of the lucky ones and I am still here because my mum had my lump sent to the laboratory for analysis. If she hadn’t, I wouldn’t be here today as without treatment I might have only lasted a couple of months.. I hope all my mates out there will have parents that do the same. If a vet ever tells you there is nothing to worry about when a lump is removed, always ask for it to be sent off to the lab for conformation. Vets are human and mistakes can happen. Never delay in getting lumps checked as delays can be the difference between life and death.

I am lucky that I have been given the chance to have many more years ahead of me. Dr Ken and his staff knew exactly what I needed. Even though I don’t like going there my mum said it is for my own good. If there was any changes, they would be picked up quick and treated.

Now I can spend my days playing with my mates, although it is hard to find a playmate who can keep up with me. They always run out of steam before I do. My brother Farrell is also teaching me how to garden and help bring in the washing. My mum is not happy about this. I also do fundraising events for my mates in rescue shelters, which is where I came from.. I sit with my tin and get lots of pats and turn on the charm so my tins fills up. I am a big ham at it these days as I have been doing it for years. At least now I should be around for years enjoying life, thanks to Dr Ken. He gave me a second chance. 

Frodo
** Sadly Frodo passed away on 20 April 2014 as a result of Vinca poisoning (also known as periwinkle). He survived cancer 4.5yrs and was cancer free when he passed.

Supplied by Caninecancer.org.au the Australian Canine Cancer website. The aim of this site is to provide owners with one point where they can find relevant information about cancer in their canine companions.

We would like to thank Lisa for a great article on canine caner. If you have any questions you can use the link to go to their website. Lisa is very passionate about Vinca poisoning, please protect your dogs.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

How Do You Identify A Problematic Dog?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about How do you identify a problematic dog.

Our guest blogger today is Mary Rose of Dogs World, where she is a Dog Care and Behavior Coach.

Make a list of all your dog’s problematic behaviours and what your thoughts and feelings are about them.
This will help you to become more aware and help you to achieve clarification about the problems you and your dog are facing and start to locate an identifiable pattern to the perceived problematic behaviours.
Follow these steps:-

A)      Identify your ambitions.
Write down next to each problem what your ambitions are to resolve the problem and what outcome you would like to achieve.
This is the key to beginning to adopt a more positive mindset and attitude that there is an achievable end goal in sight.

B)      Identify how health & behaviour can be linked.
List down all of your dogs medical history including and injuries, operations and prescribed medication your dog may have received including the dates of the last vaccinations and flea/and worm treatments.
Often changes in behaviour can occur after medication or treatments have been administered or can be linked to some pain or imbalance somewhere inside of your dog.

C)      Identify current diet & feeding patterns.
Make a list of all the foods your dog consumes including any human foods you feed it or pet treats from the pet shop.
Read the ingredient labels and begin to educate yourself on what these ingredients actually are as they often use technical names or proper names to disguise ingredients. (Like `derivatives` – means a copy of!)
Chances are when you learn what is in most pet foods you will begin to see why they are causing imbalances to your dog’s internal system.

D)      Identify patterns and triggers in your dog’s immediate environment.
Make a diary of when the problem behaviours occur and what is happening in the current environment when it happens.
Also note down what you were doing and feeling at the time: This will help you to identify common triggers and patterns to the behaviours your dog is showing and how you respond to them.

E)      Treat the cause, not the effect.
Problematic behaviour in animals usually stems from an underlying imbalance in the immune or nervous systems and these imbalances can be treated very effectively with natural diets and treatments.

F)      Learn how to communicate with your dog effectively.
Understand that your dog’s problematic behaviour can often be that they are trying to communicate to you that one or some of their needs are not being met.
They cannot speak or understand human language, (only pick up on the tonatality of your voice- the way you say it) they use various forms of behaviours & body language to communicate to you how they are feeling.

G)      Animals often mirror our own deep seated problems.
If you have a dog who is fearful and nervous, check into see what you are feeling nervous or fearful about in life.
If your dog is aggressive maybe you are dealing with aggression issues in your own life, either, with yourself, your family members or a work situation.
If your dog starts to urinate or defecate in your house then it could mean a change of diet is needed or that you are carrying deep seated sadness, guilt or grief. (Or: just marking territory in a new/ other house!)
Dog & Owner coaching deals with the owners’ thoughts, emotions and feelings and offers you ways to become a calm confident and natural leader that you dog will look up to and respect naturally.

Thank you Mary Rose for a very insightful article.

Mary Rose is a CiDBT Qualified Dog Behaviourist & Coach
for & on behalf of Just Dogs World
T: 01572 717001
M: 07976 767727
E: maryrose@justdogsworld.com
W: www.justdogsworld.com
T: @JustDogsWorld

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

Making Your Garden Pet Safe

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

 

Today’s session is from Chamile, who loves her garden and her dog, but sometimes they don’t love each other. She writes when she is not busy with work and home chores.
How to make your garden dog friendly

Taking a dog as a companion in your home is a great decision. This type of pets are extremely loving, easily trained and will make a great addition to your family, especially if you have kids. Choosing your new friend is easy but with that also comes the responsibility of preparing your home for the incoming. The house must be secured and the necessary improvements for the dog must be in place. The outdoor environment also must receive your attention because the dogs likes to have as much space as possible and a thing like a garden, for example, would turn out to be its favourite playground.

If until now you’ve worked on your garden in a certain pattern, after you bring your buddy home everything will change. Introducing a few improvements here and there in this area will make you feel more comfortable and calm that your dog is all right out there and they won’t take up much of your time.

 

Secure the fencing
The fence is the first and most important thing you should provide for your garden. The heigh of the fence should be suitable for the kind of dog you are getting. For instance, a breed like husky requires a stronger and higher fence because with the time this type of dogs get pretty large and could jump over almost anything. You can also put some fencing around the areas which look dangerous for your pet or which you’ve recently worked on. Later you can arrange rocks as a border and a warning for your dog not to go there.

The plants shouldn’t be hazardous
Dogs are known for their love of chewing plants, that is something that you won’t be able to change no matter how hard you train your pet. Better take the necessary precautions in advance, if you don’t want to risk poisoning your dog unintentionally. In case you are not familiar with the nature of some of the plants in your garden, better consult with the veterinarian.

Safe cleaning detergents and pesticides
The products you use for cleaning your garden and fighting the pests in there should also be changed, Bayswater cleaning carpets  suggest. Unlike us, the dogs are constantly in contact with the earth because they are shorter and their fur collects particles from everything they touch. The pesticides and herbicides you are using now are probably very toxic and might have a bad effect on your new buddy. To protect it, better start using more eco friendly detergents and products when cleaning the garden. Just in case, limit the access of your dog to the treated areas anyway.
Don’t forget the dog house
Your garden won’t be entirely dog friendly until you put a nice little house for your favourite pet. This is a place where your buddy will rest after hours of running and playing in the garden and like the other things it has to be specifically designed according to the breed. You can easily buy one, there are hundreds of different models on the market these days or you can make it yourself. If you choose the second one make sure that you use safe and resistant materials which will survive the test of time and the teeth and claws attacks of your pet.

The preparations are done and now all that is left to do is go out and bring home your new furry friend. After you make the necessary beneficial improvements in your home and in your garden you will see that you and your dog will feel much better and most importantly, will get along better. There are still a few rules you have to teach your pet but that will happen naturally. For now just enjoy the companionship of your new best friend.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net . You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

June Is Adopt A Senior Month!

Dachshund Rescue of North America
June 2014 news letter.

June is Adopt a Senior Month

June is Adopt a Sr Month DRNA
June is Adopt a Sr Month DRNA

June is Adopt-a-Senior Month with DRNA. This is the month that we honor our neediest group of dachshunds by allowing you to adopt them with no adoption fee! This year, DRNA is including 8 and 9 year olds in our Senior Group so for June, the adoption fee for 8 year olds and up will be waived. Please consider providing one of these special dogs, like OSCAR below, their forever home!
Seniors are our most under-appreciated group of dogs due to pre-conceived ideas regarding their care and life span. Seniors can be the best dogs to adopt since they are most likely house trained and have knowledge of basic commands before coming into rescue. They require little training when they arrive in their forever home. Most of them are laid back but still have the youthful exuberance of a puppy. With the proper care and nutrition, seniors can live to the ripe old age of 18-20 years old. These dogs stay in our foster homes sometimes for more than a year, so check out our available seniors and consider providing them with their final home. They just need a place to live out their twilight years.

Oscar
#09962
Oscar is a miniature wirehair dachshund with longer legs then a typical doxie and a tail that curls. He was rescued along with a buddy from a poor living situation in rural Virginia. He and his buddy were immediately taken to a vet and, except for fleas, found in reasonably good health. Oscar wasn’t as lucky as his buddy as he lost 95% of his coat from the fleas, but with a little TLC Oscar flourished. Oscar is a very lively, strong willed, and affectionate little guy. He can run and dodge with surprising agility and speed and he can destroy a stuffed toy in minutes. Oscar will tell you when he wants outside, when he wants out of his crate, and when he wants to his breakfast or dinner. Oscar loves being outside in back yard, but is leash walked to do his business.
If you are looking for a young senior (Oscar is 8 yrs old) AND you do not have cats (Oscar is not fond of cats) AND have a fenced backyard Oscar maybe the right little guy for you. Oscar’s adoption fee of $150 will be waived for any approved adopter during Adopt-A-Senior month.
Want to know more about Oscar? Email his foster family at:
bethmittleman@verizon.net

Oscar 9962
Oscar 9962

Autumn
#17010
When Autumn was rescued from a local shelter, she was very sick, extremely thin, full of parasites, severe dental disease and had kennel cough. It took 4 long weeks to finally get this girl well.
Now, Autumn is ready for adoption. Autumn loves taking naps, and usually wants a bed in and out of the way of every one else. She will cry at you to pick her up for some “lap time”, but then is usually ready to go to the best comfy dog bed she can find to nap or sleep. She demands 3 meals a day and on time. Autumn will use piddle pad so she would be great for an apartment. She is a hoot and we love her for it.
If you can give this sweetheart a retirement home, please fill out an application at: www.drna.org
Want to know more about Autumn? Email her foster family at:
fortdox@gmail.com

Autumn 17010
Autumn 17010

Maddie
#10754
Maddie’s actual name is Madeline Merlot because she whines a lot! She’s just adorable as she sits on your foot while you’re watching TV. She wants to be touching you and she’s a great cuddler.
Maddie was an owner surrender and it is apparent that she was a daddy’s girl. She’s fine with her foster mom as long as her foster dad isn’t home. Once he walks in the door it’s all about him.
Maddie gets along with most dogs but really doesn’t care if they’re around or not. She’s just as happy to be the only furbaby in the house. But NO LARGE DOGS. She was attacked by a Great Dane and is terrified of large dogs now.
She loves to run around the backyard and lay in the sun coming thru the window. Now the car is another story. She sits in her spot and doesn’t act up but she whines and talks the whole car ride. It’s actually kind of funny. It sounds like she’s muttering under her breath.
Maddie weighed 15 pounds when she came to us and is now down to 13 in less than 2 weeks. She’s starting to get her girlish shape back! She has decided she likes apple slices, kale stems and other veggies as treats. She is happy to sleep in the big bed or her doggie bed while she burrows under her huge blankets.
Madeline Merlot is being fostered in NE Ohio and can pack her bags at a moment’s notice – while she talks in the car all the way to you.
Her adoption fee is $150.00 Please fill out an application at:
www.drna.org
Want to know more about Maddie? Email her foster family at:
fortdox@gmail.com

Maddie 10754
Maddie 10754

 

Dachshund Rescue of North America, Website: http://www.drna.org
Adoption Process & Application: http://www.drna.org/Adoption_Process
Donations: http://www.drna.org/donate.php
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DRNArescue