Spring Has Sprung!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about protecting your dogs while you get your yard in shape for the summer.

It’s that time of the year again and as everyone is getting their yards into shape for the summer, but don’t forget that many of the things that we may want to do to our yards maybe harmful to our dogs. While we can’t make our yards 100% safe for our dogs, we can limit the harmful things that we put in them. One of the main things people do to make their yards look nice is to weed and mulch the flower beds. Fertilizers, pesticides and mulch are all poisonous to dogs and cats.

Fertilizers, pesticides, and weed killers that are commonly used, all are poisonous to cats and dogs.  While these products are designed to do different things in the yard, they all affect your pet the same way… BADLY! The chemicals used in these products are highly poisonous and will affect your pets nervous system. Care should be taken to keep these away from pets and pets away from them. Even the “natural” products are dangerous to your pets health (these are made from the Chrysanthemum flower). . Your best bet is to keep all garden products away from your pets.

 

Regardless of which products your pet gets into, the effects on them will be the same. The above chemicals will affect your pets nervous system. They disrupt the nervous system and can cause your pet to die. Some signs and symptoms to watch for, is watering of the eyes, excessive salivation, uncontrolled urination. Or the direct opposite, dry eyes, hot dry skin, dry mouth, flushed skin, red gums and eyes, the inability to urinate.  Your pet may seize (shake uncontrollably, urinate and become unconscious), stop breathing and ultimately die. While there are antidotes and medications that can help your pet and possibly control these symptoms, they require Interveinous (IV),  injection or infusion medications. That means you need to get your pet to the vets as soon as you see any signs and symptoms.

While doing research for this article, I looked at the different types of mulch that is readily available to put in our yard’s flower beds. The popular mulches include; wood mulch both dyed and not dyed, rubber mulch, licorice root mulch, cocoa shell mulch and compost mulch. Of all the mulches, natural composted yard waste is the safest for your pet. The wood mulch, especially the dyed mulch can be poisonous to your pets. The rubber mulch is not digestible and could cause an obstruction in the digestive tract. The licorice mulch can be poisonous to your pet, I was not able to find any info that said it was safe, with any processed mulch, we don’t know exactly what chemicals are used to process it, so I always error on the side of caution and consider it poisonous until proven safe. Cocoa mulch is the shell that is left over from the production of chocolate, so besides chocolate being poisonous, the shells from the cocoa seeds are dangerous, if ingested they could cause blockages and lacerations in the digestive tract.

So in conclusion, while it is exciting to feel the warm weather of spring and seeing the plants start to bud and bloom, remember that when using products to clean up your yard, be careful. Our dogs and cats are smaller than us and poisons will affect them sooner and from smaller amounts and shorter exposure times. Always try to use natural products, but beware, some “natural” products are also poisonous. Bottom line, be careful, watch your pet closely and do your best to provide a safe environment for both you and your pets. Enjoy the transformation of spring and enjoy your summer.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

 

Hello, Nice To Meet You.

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about how to introduce a new dog to your pack. We are going to talk about properly introducing a new dog to your pack, then we are going to make sure you keep your pack and your new dog safe while integrating your new dog in the pack.

Okay, you just adopted a new dog or you have a new foster, either way, you need to introduce the dog to your pack. The one thing you absolutely do not want to do is bring spike home and bring him inside to show your new pack. This would be a disaster.

What you need to do is make the introduction on neutral ground where both your pack and Spike will meet as equals. Take spike for a walk when you get him home. Have someone else take your pack out for a walk as well. While out on a walk, on neutral ground, let the dogs meet. Allow them to sniff each other and greet each other in a normal way. The best greeting is for dogs to greet each other by sniffing each other’s butts. This is non confrontational and socially acceptable (in the dog world).

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If Spike or your dogs bark at each other while approaching the greeting, immediately tell that dog NO! Then turn around and walk the other way. Continue to walk away until the dog stops barking. Then when the dog is relaxed, walk toward the other dog or dogs again. If the barking starts again, repeat the same process. This should only take a few types before the dogs understand it is not ok to bark when meeting other dogs.

You may want to keep the greeting short and continue walking separately and then meet up again in a few minutes making sure that the greetings stay pleasant. After the greeting take the leashes of your pack and walk them and spike together. Walk the pack with spike for a little bit to allow them to get used to each other.

Daisy and Gunner

When you get home make sure you enter your home first to establish and reinforce your position as alpha leader to both spike and your pack. Once in the house you want to make sure you are always with Spike when he is around your pack. You want to be extra observant, so you can stop any problems before they become a problem. You need to allow Spike to find his place within the pack, until that place is defined, Spike needs to be crated at night and crated anytime you are not home. This is a very important point, because the life of Spike and or the life of one of your pack could be saved by doing this. The last thing you want to do is go out for the day leaving all the dogs loose in your home only to come back and find one or more dogs severely injured or even dead because they got into a fight and no one was able to stop it.

It’s important to establish yourself as Alpha leader and establish Spikes place within the pack. When you feed your dogs, have them all sit and wait for you to place their food down. Then you have them “wait” until you say it is ok to eat. When you feed your dogs, make sure you feed them in order of their pack rank (unless you make them all wait until all the food is down, then you let them eat all at once), make sure Spike is fed last. Whenever you go through a door, make sure you go first and then allow Spike. You are the Alpha, so as a pack leader, you have the privilege of eating first and eating the prime pieces of food, you get to sit and lay on the softest and best places. Since you are the leader the rest of the pack follows, so therefore you must go first. Working with Spike and teaching him tricks is also a great way to help establish and reinforce your role as Alpha. One thing that you absolutely should not due is have Spike sleep in your bed. If you let Spike sleep in your bed as soon as he is brought into the house, you are elevating Spike to the level of your pack and to your level as Alpha leader. Spike needs to settle into the pack, establish his spot and then learn his way, before he can have special privileges.

Once Spike knows his position in the pack and sees you as the Alpha pack leader, you can slowly start giving Spike the privileges that the rest of the pack has. These can be, laying or sitting on the furniture, laying in bed while you are watching TV. The very last privilege should be, being allowed to sleep in bed.

The last thing that you want is Spike to challenge you for the Alpha position because you gave him bed privileges too soon.

We hope this helps you with introducing new members to your pack. We want every pack to be happy. Tell us your experiences, so that other can learn.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

 

 

Bailey Chairs and Mega-esophagus

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans help dogs by giving useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about Mega-esophagus and a special lady that helps dogs that have this.

It all began by accident and its now been 10 months since we built our first Bailey Chair for a precious Valley Bulldog named Gremlin, who has a condition called Canine Mega-esophagus.

gremlin

My name is Susan and I have a service dog named Gigi.  I am a 3 time Cancer survivor and am now battling cancer once again.   During my treatments, I would try to find things to keep my mind occupied and I started sharing my life and travels with Gigi on a few of the social media networks, Instagram being one of them (@susan_and_gigi).  I began following a woman named Chrissy and she followed me back.  At one point, she commented on one of my photos showing a custom bed that my husband had made for Gigi.  She absolutely loved the bed and jokingly asked if my husband could build a chair for her dog, Gremlin.  Of course, I was curious why a dog would need a chair and had to ask Chrissy.  She responded by telling me that Gremlin had a condition called Canine Mega-esophagus and needed to eat in an upright position.  She suggested that I view their video on YouTube showing Gremlin and how he had to eat.  Well, after seeing Gremlin in the video, I fell in love and built that precious dog a special chair, which is called a Bailey Chair.  Chrissy invited me to join a Mega-esophagus support group and I was so impressed and humbled by the love and constant care provided by the owners of these special dogs.  The financial burden of this condition is daunting and the need for Bailey Chairs is essential to the survival of these dogs.

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I’m sure by now, you are wondering what Canine Mega-esophagus is….

Mega-esophagus is difficult to detect and diagnose and the medical options are few. The muscles of the esophagus fail and it cannot propel food or water into the stomach  (Its like a balloon that has been inflated several times and then hangs limp). The result is that ingested food sits in the esophagus within the chest cavity and never makes it to the stomach.

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The most serious complication is that digestive fluid/food will at some point pool in the esophagus, which generally results in aspiration (breathing in), of digestive fluid/food, leading to pneumonia (Aspiration Pneumonia). Mega-esophagus can occur at any age.

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Symptoms include the following:

Regurgitation of water, mucous or food (Regurgitation is throwing up without any warning; not to be confused with vomiting, which is associated with retching). Loss of appetite or refusal to eat. Sudden weight loss. Swallowing difficulty, exaggerated and/or frequent swallowing. They will also try to clear their throat frequently with a hacking sound. Sour and/or foul smelling breath. Many canines may be misdiagnosed with a gastrointestinal problems. Aspiration Pneumonia is a frequent complication. When Chrissy posted a picture of Gremlin in his new chair, we received so many responses from people wanting to know how they could purchase a chair. It was then, that I realized we had to help and we began making Bailey Chairs for whoever needed them. As we continued to make chairs for these precious dogs, I always posted pictures of the chairs on all of my social networking sites (Instagram, Facebook, etc.).

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We received so many responses from people who were interested, that we decided to start a donation site called Bailey Chairs 4 Dogs www.baileychairs4dogs.com . This allowed people to donate money for a chair for their own dog, or for another dog in need whose owner could not afford the cost of a chair.  The cost of building a Bailey Chair can vary depending on the size, but we only ask for the amount needed to purchase materials and ship the chair.  None of the proceeds go towards the labor of these chairs, as they are built out of love for these dogs.  We build these chairs in our garage during my husband’s spare time.

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Over the past 10 months, we have built over 327 chairs.  213 of those have been donated. We have also donated chairs to over 27 rescue/shelters nationwide. For every chair we sell, we donate a chair. We have also been able to donate chairs thanks to private donations and donations from Companies such as Hoff Productions, Mary  Kay, Scentsy, and For Tails Only. It absolutely amazes me the support we have received from total strangers. They all come together for the good of the dog, our canine companion, and it is a beautiful thing to see. We ship chairs all over the U.S and have even shipped chairs to Canada, Australia, Ireland  and England.

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As I mentioned before, for every chair that is purchased, we donate a chair and we recently had a local family purchase a chair for their Chihuahua, Diego. We were then able to donate a chair to Hero, a German Shepherd being cared for by Tamara at Animal Rescue Recon in Brentwood, Ca. They both showed up at the same time to pick up their chairs and were able to meet one another.  It was very touching. We truly love making these chairs for our fellow fur friends and hope that people continue to come together and help us get chairs to all those in need.  We also hope that this article brings understanding and awareness about the severity of this condition, to all dog owners.  Mega-esophagus is not discriminating and can affect all breeds of dogs.

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For more information on Mega-esophagus or on how you can donate to help us build Bailey Chairs, please visit the following sites.

www.baileychairs4dogs.com

facebook.com/baileychairs4dogs

www.caninemegaesophagusinfo.com

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Susan and her husband are awesome! They are providing a much needed service and chairs to some very deserving and needy dogs. Please help them continue to help dogs in need by spreading the word and this article.

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Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

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Guest Bloggers Wanted

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

We are currently looking for guest bloggers! The best way to help humans, help dogs, is to share our experiences. So if you have a great tip, or you have a lot of experience with dogs or you just want to get involved in rescue, we want you to guest blog with us. The subjects can be on anything that can helps dogs and animals, writing about how to blog, how to use twitter, how to use Face book, how you way your dog, tips on training, etc.

We are also looking for comments about this site and the articles and podcasts we publish. Help us help you! Tell us how we are doing. If you want to see an article on a topic, let us know.

Thank  You,

Daisy

Daisy laying in the grass

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

Just A Little Busy!

Hello,

We haven’t posted a new article recently, because we were a little busy. While it is not an excuse, it is our reason. A few weeks ago we got a call from a coworker that her neighbor had “come into money and moved to Florida, leaving behind a dog, horse and her kid”. While Daisy’s Rescue isn’t a rescue, we do work with a lot of rescues. We of course offered our assistance in helping the horse and dog.

We don’t know much about horses, except that they must eat regularly or they can develop problems and can die. The horse is named Rose and is 20 years old and the Dog is named Daisy.  The story is the mother came into money, tried to load the horse into a horse trailer, but couldn’t get the horse in and decided to leave the horse, dog and kid behind.

So, we worked hard going through all of our contacts and our contacts, contacts. To make a very long story short, we were able to find a rescue for the dog Daisy and the rescue was able to find an adopter for the horse Rose.

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Daisy.

So now Daisy is in her forever home and so is Rose all safe and sound. The child left behind is being taking care of, he is a teenager. We are not involved with any legal proceedings, we were just worried about the animals.

Just when we thought that we could relax, I found a stray dog running around on a busy street in a city. While at work I saw a small yorkie running loose on a busy city street. After we were done our task at hand, we went back to the street and the yorkie was still there. With the help of my partner, we were able to catch Amelia the yorkie. She was dirty, thin and had long 1/2 long nails.

Now, I had to figure out what I was going to do with Amelia. I can’t keep her while I’m at work and I have nowhere to put her. Luckily, I have a friend who lived a few miles away. So I quickly get on the phone and catch her before she leaves her home. She is home and off from work, Amelia is quickly dropped off. Now I know she is safe and in good hands until I get off work.

Amelia

 

Amelia after her bath.

I picked up Amelia after work, she was bathed and groomed, she was a pretty little angel. When we got home Amelia had a nice big healthy meal and had a nice padded warm bed.  The next day she was accepted by a rescue. Amelia has been fixed and needs her teeth cleaned. She has limes disease and is now on antibiotics for treatment. She is going to her forever home very soon, where she will be loved and cherished until the  end of her days.

Amelia

Amelia

 

Amelia in her foster home. Amelia is a sweet little girl. She loves to be on the lap of her human. She gets along with other dogs and children, and is afraid of kittens.  Rescue Express stepped up to find her a great home www.rescueexpress.org . If you would like to help out with Amelia’s care or if you would like to see if you can give her a great forever home, or one of the other very deserving dogs, please go to their site.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

 

 

 

Red Paw An Emergency Relief Organization For Pets!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping humans and rescue groups learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of and rescue dogs. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. We are here for you. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, and or are featured here in the article. Use these links to find the product to purchase or to research.

Today’s session is about Red Paw, the emergency relief response organization for pets.

We have asked Jen to tell us a little about Red Paw, how she got started and some of the problems she must overcome on a daily basis. Here is Jen’s story.

Red Paw Fire Ground

Red Paw has been a work in progress for many years and a direct result my experiences on the fire ground. I was a Philadelphia Fire Fighter for seven years and an American Red Cross, Disaster Action Team responder for 8 years and the Philadelphia County Animal Response Team Coordinator for 6 years — time and time again, I’d go to a disaster scene and watch as pets were left with no organization to provide emergency assistance or care in the event of a fire, building collapse, gas leak, etc.

Red Paw on scene

Two specific incidents sparked Red Paw’s birth. A few years ago, a two alarm fire in Center City resulted in the death of two dogs and a cat because there was not a procedure in place to help them. I was responding with the Red Cross and saw the owners carrying the dogs in their arms screaming for help, but no one was there to help them. I used my personal vehicle to rush them to Penn Veterinary Hospital (while the owners were giving them oxygen with equipment borrowed from a medic unit) but they later died.

The second incident occurred in January 2011 at a three alarm fire at an apartment complex in West Philly. Cats were being taken out of the building in laundry baskets and rushed to the shelter without crates or emergency vet care. Dozens of cats were trapped in the building for weeks afterwards with no procedure in place to help them get out.

Red Paw crate

Shortly after that fire, I brought my proposal for Red Paw to the American Red Cross — to work in conjunction with their responders when there are pets on scene. Six months later Red Paw was born and clearly the need On July 25th 2011 at midnight we officially began! Since then we’ve been called to assist close to 600 times in Southeastern PA and helped nearly 1000 displaced pets (http://redpawemergencyreliefteam.com/annual-results/)!

Red Paw’s first response was 5:30 in the morning, and we’d only been up and running for less than six hours when the phone rang. The American Red Cross was on the other line! The Bridge (their 24 hour emergency call center) staff person says, “Good morning Jen, we have a fire for you. Six Pit Bulls were displaced in North Philly. You can help right?” Now, I planned for six months before starting Red Paw, I talked to other orgs, rescues, animal businesses, vets and stakeholders. I thought I had all my bases covered, I had no idea!! 

Prior to Red Paw there was no organization doing this in Philly, or anywhere in the country! This brought about several challenges! Not only were we a brand new non-profit org but we were also an emergency response organization (that no one had ever heard of and were unclear about what we actually did) and an animal rescue (but not a shelter, which confuses people). All three of those separately have their own challenges, together it’s like a whole other animal:) 

Excited and slightly panicked about our first response ever, I said yes to the ARC dispatcher, jumped out of bed and ran to the computer. First things first. Put out a call through One Call Now (a tool used to send one message to multiple phones at the same time) to all of the rescues, facilities and volunteers who had agreed, during the planning process, to help us with emergency response when we started. Well, OCN was down, and I couldn’t get a call to go out! So it’s 5:30 in the morning, the Red Cross has just called to use our services for the first time, there are six displaced Pit Bulls, and I can’t get a message to my resources for help! Slight panic had turned into full blown panic!

Luckily, I had a few personal numbers in my phone of people who had said they were in from the beginning and wanted to help! So I started dialing. First up was Portia, from Central Bark Doggy Day Care, who immediately said, “Yes, we have room, bring them here.” Next up was a volunteer who I had worked with through Philly County Animal Response Team, and he was up and willing to meet me on scene.

As I rolled up to the fire dwelling the fire department vehicles were gone, and the first thing I saw was the Red Cross responder on-scene. This immediately made me feel better! I walked up to the owners and stated that I was from Red Paw and explained, “We are like the Red Cross for Animals, we are going to keep your dogs for you while you recover from the fire.” Next were some questions: “Are the dogs normally friendly with people? Are they friendly with other dogs? Are they spayed, neutered, and vaccinated?”

It turned out that two of the dogs had gotten into a fight during the fire due to fear and stress of what was happening and needed to be kept separate and probably needed some medical attention. None of them were s/n or vaccinated but they were normally friendly with people. Two of the dogs were just little puppies so that made things a bit easier, but the other four were big Pitties! One by one we got them situated in my car and the volunteer’s vehicle, and off to Central Bark we went.

Red Paw

This was one of those things I just did not consider in my planning phase of Red Paw! I did not consider the health and well begin of the pets we were brining in, outside of the health needs from the fire or disaster, of course. I guess I was a bit nieve, I just assumed people cared for their pets the way I care for mine! In fairness, I do not except others to sleep on the floor so as to not disturb their sleeping dogs who are covered in fleece blankets, snoring with their heads on pillows!:) But I did not plan for the amount of wellness exams and procedures the animals we assist need. So much so that we had to create a Wellness Coordinator position to handle them all! 

One of our goals now is to return the pets to their families in better condition than we got them in! They all get check ups by vets, they get s/n (as long as the owner agrees), they get vaccinated, dewormed, flea medicine, bathed, groomed, nails trimmed,etc, whatever the animal needs to be healthy and happy while in our care.

Now, the reason I asked the clients the question, “Are they normally friendly?”  was because, like people, pets all respond differently to stress. These guys spread the entire spectrum: the puppies, AJ and Taz, not phased at all; Phat Phat, the momma, was pretty good as well; Bishop, BoiBoi, and Kilo were very stressed out to the point that we almost couldn’t get them out of the vehicles and into their crates at CB! The thing about working with dogs, especially in stressful situations, is that you need to be patient, which is hard to do when it’s now 7:45 in the morning and you are about to be late for work! Luckily, the staff at CB was able to ease the stress and get everyone into their crates without issue. Once everyone was settled in, off to work I went.

Bishop, BoiBoi, Kilo, Phat Phat, AJ, and Taz spent the next four months at Central Bark, even though we say that we will only give clients 30-60 days of care for their animals. Our goal, however, is to reunite families, so we worked with them daily to keep them involved in their animals’ care and assist them in taking back their pets. They obviously loved these dogs but they were overwhelmed! Six Pit Bulls, six dogs of any breed, are a lot of work! We educated them on s/n and vaccinations, and we got all but Boi Boi spayed and neutered. We also worked with them on adopting out AJ and Taz, the puppies, and both went to amazingly loving homes. And most importantly, after many conversations with the family about surrendering vs keeping them, we were able to kept the other four together and reunited them with their family!

Red Paw

One of the biggest surprises for me personally and a challenge for the org is the “surrendered” animals we end up with. We do everything in our power to keep families together and reunite. We’ve had animals in our care for up to eight months! That is challenge number one because a lot of the time, especially for larger dogs surrendered to us or with us long term, we end up boarding them and have to pay for their long term housing, which can get very pricey! We adopt out all of our adoptables, ourselves, we do not bring them to shelters or give them to rescues. We do it all in house to take the burden off of the already burdened rescue groups and shelters.

When I started planning for Red Paw I did not take that aspect into consideration, I just never thought owners would not want their animals back, especially after everything we had gone through to keep them together! 

This first response for Red Paw was a snowball effect that has not stopped! I planned for months and months, used my emergency response experience, my animal response experience, and pulled from the knowledge of other rescues, animal handlers, emergency response organizations and vets to make sure I addressed all issues before we began. There isn’t a day that goes by, almost three years later, that something doesn’t come up that I never planned for!!

To say this has been a learning experience would be an understatement! I set out to start an emergency response organization for pets, and Red Paw is that, but we turned out to be an animal rescue, an animal welfare organization, an adoption center and a human service resource! This has been, by far, the hardest thing I have ever done in my life, and I was a Philadelphia Fire Fighter for 7 years! But it’s also the most rewarding and exciting thing as well! Red Paw provides a much-needed resource in the community, proven by how busy we have been! Fires will never not happen and people will always have pets. The people have the Fire Department and the American Red Cross and now the pets have Red Paw!

Red Paw

Red Paw in an all volunteer organization. We provide our services FREE of charge to our clients solely through individual donations! To DONATE please go to www.redpawemergencyreliefteam.org/donate     www.redpawemergencyreliefteam.com/
Red Paws, 1328 S 24th St, Philadelphia, PA 19146  (267) 289-2729
Red Paw Facebook page      Red Paw Email address redpawanimals@gmail.com
Thank you Jen. That is an amazing story and you are providing a much needed service and are doing an amazing job!

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/

 

2014 USDA Website Access.

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Today’s session is about how to access the new 2014 updated USDA APHIS website.

The USDA APHIS or the United States Department of Agriculture division of Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, is the federal governments department that is responsible for the safety of animals and the compliance of large scale commercial dog breeders or what we call Puppy Mills. The USDA redesigned their website for 2014. While the way you access it didn’t change, the look did, so here is a step by step tutorial on how to access the website. Remember, you can search all animal labs, circus’s, breeders and brokers.

2014 USDA Website Animal Welfare

 

This is the first page of the USDA APHIS Website www.aphis.usda.gov. Look to the left and see “Animal Welfare”, click on it.

2014 USDA APHIS Animal welfare page

 

On the left hand side is the “Animal Welfare Act” , click on that and you will go to the next page.

2014 USDA APHIS Animal Welfare page

Now, on the right hand side is the AWA Inspections, click on that link.

2014 USDA APHIS Inspection Link

In the middle of this page you will find a bold “Inspection“. Under this heading after a brief explanation of what the USDA is supposed to do, you will find “Search Active Licensees and Registered Facilities”. You want to click on this and it will take you to the “WARNING PAGE”. As best as I can figure, this page is meant to scare away anyone who is not serious about looking up inspection results. It basically says, that the government has the right to look at your computer while you are searching their inspection results, or that you can expect to have someone watch you as you search their site, you know the government, they are such voyeurs. Either way you have to say  “I Agree” or you can’t get in.

2014 USDA APHIS I Agree Page

 

So, you click I agree. and then you are taken to the basic search page. Oh, and just to make sure you really want to get in they may make you wait up to 90 seconds to load the page, so be patient.

2014 USDA APHIS Basic search License

 

We are now at the “Basic search license and registration page”. Look down to the second set of bold tabs in the middle os the page. Under “Results”, is the license and registration, click in the tab next to that, it will say “Inspection Information”. Click that. 2014 USDA Basic inspection page Inspect link

Ok now that the “inspection results” have been clicked. we are ready to search the inspection records. Be warned the web site is very slow. I think they do that on purpose so it is harder to access. I typed in PA to the search.

2014 USDA APHIS PA Search result

 

This is what the results are. I’m not sure what “C” means, maybe circus, “R” means research and “A” means breeder, “B” means broker. So lets see what our search came up with. Looks like 2 circus’s a breeder and 2 research labs. Lets look at the breeder first. On the far right of the page is a printer (you can click to print that result), then the “details” click that to expand the inspection results. Next is the customer number and type of license (A, B, C, R), the name of the organization or person, the date of inspection and then the results of the inspection. How many violations if any.  So let look at the breeder.

2014 USDA APHIS breeder number of dogs

 

She has no violations, but at the bottom of the page we can see how many dogs she has. She had 51 Dogs and 27 puppies at the time of the inspection. I can’t imagine all those dogs living inside the house as pets. Please play around with the web site. The more you use it the more you can get out of it. Look up Purina and see how many animals they have in their lab.

Here are some short cut links. To go to the USDA site www.aphis.usda.gov . To go straight to the “Warning Page” https://acissearch.aphis.usda.gov/LPASearch/faces/Warning.jspx

 

If you have any problems please email us. We will be happy to help you. If you like this post please let us know.  We love to hear from you.

Thank you for joining us today at Daisy’s Rescue (www.daisysrescue.com), we hope that you enjoyed todays article and that you found it helpful. Please remember to visit and like our Face Book page at www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . You can email Daisy at daisysrescue@comcast.net .  You can download Daisy’s Rescue podcasts at ITunes.com or www.daisysrescue.com/podcast/