Fly The Friendly Skies… And Die?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Flying with your dog.

Every year many people travel and they want to bring their dog. Many people opt to have their dog go in the cargo hold. Supposedly, the airlines will take great care of the dog, kept inside until the last minute and then last to load and first to unload and back into a climate controlled are. Sadly, many pets die each year while traveling. Many dogs die during the transport in the hold. This story is a little different. This dog died because of poor treatment and neglect prior to loading. If this was my dog and I saw what was happening, I would have been very vocal and demand something be done immediately. Here is the story.

By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO (Reuters) – Michael Jarboe of Miami paid extra for special airline dog handlers to ensure the safety of his 2-year-old mastiff, BamBam, on a cross-country flight.

Instead, following a layover in Houston in 90-degree heat, baggage handlers found BamBam dead on arrival in San Francisco.

Just in time for the holiday travel season, a Change.org petition is calling for new federal rules holding airlines responsible for deaths of animals like BamBam. More than 100,000 signatures were logged on Jarboe’s petition as of late Tuesday, more than half of them added in the past two weeks.

Jarboe said one of his goals is to make pet owners aware about the danger of airline travel.

BamBam, who died in 2012, is hardly alone.

Pets flying with their owners are killed, injured or lost on average once every 10 days, according to Mary Beth Melchior, founder of the watchdog group Where Is Jack Inc. who keeps a tally of large carriers’ reports to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Her organization is named for a 5-year-old cat who died in 2011 after being lost for two months in New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

“You run the same risk of losing your pet as you do your luggage,” said Jarboe. “It’s Russian roulette.”

The Humane Society of the United States suggests driving with your pet or leaving your animal at home with a pet sitter before choosing airline travel.

“Air travel can be so quick that you may think a plane is the best way to transport your pet. Think again. Air travel isn’t safe for pets. The HSUS recommends that you do not transport your pet by air unless absolutely necessary,” the organization’s website cautions.

The tragedy of BamBam gained steam at Change.org after the petition was linked to Janet Sinclair’s Facebook page titled “United Airlines Almost Killed My Greyhound” dedicated to her dog Sedona’s flight experience in July.

Sinclair and Jarboe said they both chose to fly with their dogs on United because of its highly regarded Pet Safe program, which was started at Continental Airlines before the carriers’ merger.

Both said the program promised their dogs would be held before and after flights and during layovers in an air-conditioned cargo facility, and transported to and from the planes in an air-conditioned van.

They say the system broke down during layovers in Houston where they say the dogs were left on the tarmac and in non air-conditioned cargo spaces in the summer heat for hours between flights.

“Our goal is the safe and comfortable travel of all the pets that fly with us,” United’s Megan McCarthy said on Tuesday in an emailed response to Reuters concerning the cases.

“On the rare occasion we don’t deliver on that goal, we work with our customers, their vets and our team of vets to resolve the issue,” she added.

Jarboe said he and his partner could see BamBam from their seats on the plane arriving for the second leg of the flight on a luggage cart with baggage handlers, instead of the promised air-conditioned van and special dog handlers.

“We could see right in the kennel. He was standing there swaying there back and forth with his tongue hanging out farther than I’ve ever seen it, drooling,” Jarboe said.

Sinclair said she watched as baggage handlers in Houston “kick Sedona’s crate, kick, kick, kick it six times to get it under the wing and left it there to boil on the tarmac.”

Jarboe said United reported that its autopsy of BamBam was inconclusive after the death, but that his own vet was convinced the dog died of heatstroke. Jarboe said United eventually paid him about $3,770, the price of a new dog and crate.

Sinclair said United agreed to pay Sedona’s hospital bill of about $2,700 for treatment of what the vet diagnosed as heat-stroke and dehydration. But Sinclair said she declined the offer because of an airline condition that she sign a confidentiality agreement.

For holiday travelers thinking about flying with a pet, Jarboe, Sinclair and Melchior offer the same advice: Don’t.

(Editing by David Adams and Doina Chiacu)

The moral of this story is, NEVER put your pet in the hold of an airplane! Always take your dog or pet on board with you, no matter what. My Tucker was flown to me and was in the hold when he was a puppy. To this day (4 years later), he still looks up at planes when he hears them flying over head. Never again would I traumatize my dogs. My dogs are my family and they get treated with the same respect I do.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on I Tunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

emails us @ daisysrescue@comcast.net

Enjoying the sumer day.
Enjoying the sumer day.

Follow Archie as he endures the rough treatment for Heart Worms!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Heart worms. How to prevent it, how to treat it, why it is important to give your dog the monthly preventative.

Archie 2013-11

Meet Archie, he is a very sweet boy. Archie has a stage 3 heart worm infestation. Therefore, Archie is very sick despite his healthy look. Archie becomes short of breath when he plays with toys. See, Archie has worms in his heart. Well, in the artery that is between his heart and his lungs. Archie is going to have to endure very painful and poisonous treatment to kill the heart worms. If Archie survives the medication, he will have to endure the worms dying inside his body and then his body will have to absorb the dead decaying worms. Sadly, all this could have been prevented with monthly heart worm preventative medication.

This article is going to be in every day language and not in medical terminology, this is so everyone can understand how serious this condition is. I will have links to medical web sites that can explain the heart worm infection in medical detail.

Heart worms are just that, small thin long worms that live inside the arteries and heart of a dog. The worms produce more worms until the worms totally clog the arteries and damage the heart beyond repair.  The whole sad cycle starts like this. A mosquito bites and infected dog and ingests worm larva with the blood. When the mosquito bites another dog, the worm larva is deposited into the dog. Over a period of a few months, the larva slowly make their way through the dog and ends up in the dogs pulmonary artery (the artery that comes from the right side of the heart and goes to the lungs). The worms mostly live in the pulmonary artery. When the infestation is really bad, the worms can back up into the heart. There are both male and female worms. The male worms are smaller and easier to kill, the females are larger. The worms can live up to 7 years.

Now, we need to get rid of these worms. The only approved method that exists is an arsenic type of drug (immiticide), that is injected into the dog. Since arsenic is poisonous to both the dog and the worms, it is not going to be an easy road. The arsenic slowly kills the worms by starving them. It takes the worms about 10 days to die and not all the worms will die. Usually the smaller male worms die first. The usual treatment for killing heart worms is two injections of immiticide one day apart. The immiticide is the arsenic based medication. Since the body does not like it, the muscle where the injection is, becomes very sore and may swell. As with any meds, the dog may have a reaction to the medication itself. The medication attacks the worms and they start to die. When the worms start to die, the body can have a reaction to the dead worms. It has been found that the heart worms have a bacteria inside them, when the worms die, the bacteria will leak out of the worm and cause a severe reaction in the dog. So to minimize this reaction, an antibiotic is given to the dog a few weeks before the heart worm treatment begins. The antibiotic doxycycline, kills the bacteria in the worm, which also seems to weaken the worm and makes it more susceptible to the arsenic. With the bacteria gone, when the worms die they don’t leak the bacteria and the dog has less of a reaction to the dying worms. Even if the dog does not have a reaction to the meds, and the dead worms, there still is a huge risk! The worms that are dead and dying are still inside the dog and they have nowhere to go. The worms rot inside the dog. The dog’s body absorbs the dead worms. It is very important to keep the dog calm and as confined as possible. If the worms break apart they will float into the lungs and block blood vessels. These are called pulmonary embolisms. The vessels that are clogged prevent blood from going into the lungs and exchange oxygen. This is why the dog may become short of breath. The bigger the clot the greater the danger and the worse the breathing will be. This can also cause chest pain. This is why you need to really watch your dog. If he becomes short of breath, you need to check his gums to see if they are pink. If they are  pale, or blue, the dog needs to get to the vets immediately.

For small infestations, the preferred treatment is two shots 24 hours a part. The two shots will cause about 60 to 80% KILL. For bad infestations, one injection with crate rest for one month, then two shots 24 hours apart will cause up to a 98% kill rate. Oddly enough, a 100% kill rate is not the goal. The goal is to remove enough worms quickly to reduce the chance of damage to the heart and arteries. With regular monthly heart worm preventatives (to prevent new worms), the remaining adult heart worms will die eventually and then the dog will be worm free.

Crate rest is a must because any movement of the dog could cause the worms to break off and float into the lungs. The dog is to be carried outside, put down to do business and then picked up and carried back to the crate. So for bad infestations like Archie’s, crate rest is required for at least 2 months. Some people do not like to crate rest their dogs. They feel it is cruel or that they are neglecting or withholding love from the dog. The reality is, it is with great love that we crate rest these dogs, so they can have every change to survive and have a great life after the heart worm. We can’t wait to see Archie running and chasing squirrels in the back yard!

Sadly, all of this can be 100% PREVENTABLE! Just one little pill a month is all that is required to prevent all this pain and suffering.

Hear Gard Plus Heart Worm PreventativeIMG_4994

This is the Heart Gard Plus heart worm preventative. It is meat flavored to taste like a treat. Most dogs readily take the Heart Gard Plus. The preventative is weight based and every veterinary hospital and office sells heart worm preventative. There is no excuse for any dog to become heart worm positive. There are other heart worm preventatives as well, Trifexis, Sentinel, Interceptor, Iverhart, Revolution. All are easily obtained. If you feel that your veterinarian’s price is too high, you can go online with a prescription and you may be able to buy them cheaper. There is no excuse!

Archie is resting in his crate.

Archie crate rest 2013-11-14

Archie was found as a stray on the side of a country road in South Carolina. He was taken in by a good samaritan, Archie was very thin and it was apparent that Archie was out on his own for quite some time. The Dog Rescue, New Life Animal Rescue, stepped up to save him. Archie was transported up to New Jersey, where he is receiving his treatment. Archie was taken to the University of Pennsylvania Small Animal Hospital, where he was seen by veterinarian cardiologists. Archie had a ultrasound of his heart and found to have a large infestation of worms in the pulmonary artery and luckily the worms were not in his heart yet. He was put on the doxycycline for a few weeks and has just started his Immiticide shots (11-12-2013). We now have to wait one month, then he will get his two shot 24 hours apart. So far Archie is doing well. He is 4 days (11-16-2013), after his shot. He was sore the next day and he was acting like he was not feeling well, quiet and sleeping a lot. We pick him up and take him outside to go potty. He is allowed to walk on a leash in a very small area, then he is picked up again and taken back inside and he goes into his crate. Archie has two crates. We keep him in the living room with us in a bigger crate, then he goes into the bedroom with us and he has a smaller crate. We cover him up and he goes to sleep. Archie gets fed in his crate and he has his water in the crate. We do allow him to come out of the crate and allow him to sit in our laps or next to us on the couch. If he gets too excited, he goes back into the crate.

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Archie being examined at the U of Penn.

We will up date this article regularly. So come back often to see him get well. Archie’s medical bills are very expensive. If you would like to help with Archie’s medical bills, you can donate money through New Life Animal Rescue donation link. All donations will go !00% to the New Life Animal Rescue.

Links to learn more about Heart Worm prevention and treatment. www.2ndchance.inf and www.heartwormsociety.org.

Thank you for visiting Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource Page For Dog Rescue And Care. Follow us by subscribing to our web site by email, and [lease visit us on www.facebook.com/daisysrescue, www.twitter.com/daisysrescue . Email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net . Look for our podcasts on iTunes.

2013-11-23,  Archie is 11 days after his injection. This is an important time for him. This is the period where the largest amount of worms will be dying off. The medicine starves the worms and they start to die after 10 days. So, we are keeping a close eye on Archie. He has had a few episodes of breathing hard and some pain. We are assuming that the pain is the worms dying off and moving into his lungs causing small clots called embolisms. While the small clots are bad and cause mild shortness of breath, they are survivable. We are watching Archie for signs of large clots which can cause death. This is why we are so careful not to let Archie move around too much. If a group of dead worms move into the lungs and cause a major obstruction, not only will it cause severe pain, but a large amount of blood will be blocked from entering the lungs and exchanging oxygen. This effect the entire body and is not good. So far Archie is doing great. We will keep you up dated every couple of days.

2013-12-11 Archie Update.

Archie was feeling much better on the December 9, he was feeling the best since he has been with us. It was hard to keep him in the crate. He has a lot of energy. Even with some extended couch time and extra bones, he is full of energy. He seemed to enjoy the snow. He is still on limited exercise.

1468643_10200642600700011_1512506564_nDecember 10, Archie was taken back to the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, for his second and third shot of immiticide.

5fffc9f4-794e-47d4-9aaf-6824a4927ee2_profileArchie waiting in the waiting room for Dr. Dennis, his cardiologist.

Since Archie did so great, he did not have to stay over an extra night. He had a painful ride home, it was very evident he felt the road bumps. Once home he was allowed to rest and get comfortable on the big bed with his foster Dad. Archie took a few hours to relax and then finally settle down for a nice nap.

1472881_443782532389516_174678006_nArchie ended up relaxed enough, that he rolled over and laid on his back. Archie is now resting comfortably in his night time sleeping crate. Thanks to everyone wishing him well.

2013-12-14, Archie is doing great. He seems to have done better with the two shots this time than the one shot last time. He has been quiet the last few days. His pain level seems to be minimal. We are keeping him on pain meds, just to make sure. Archie seems to be a lot more active and sadly, it looks like it will be harder for him to stay in the crate. We give him bones and we do allow some couch time with him being very quiet and not allowed to move. I can’t wait for January, so Archie will be done crate rest. I can tell already, he is going to be a terror, I can’t wait!.

2014-01-22, Archie is now off crate rest and has been to the vet’s and is heart worm free!!!!!!!!! He has also been fixed. He is doing well, enjoying his freedom. He has boundless energy and is very happy to run around the house. Thank you to everyone who prayed and sent good thoughts to him.

February 7, 2014,

Archie is doing very well. He is now totally off crate rest (he has for a few weeks now). He likes the other dogs in the house, although he gets into their personal space too often. Archie has one speed… Mach 8! He runs through the house and has the amazing ability to be able to lower his head and grab toys on the fly without slowing down or missing a step.  We affectionately call him the “Red Terror”, he has to remove every toy from the toy bin and leave them all over the house. If we do not watch Archie like a hawk, we find bits of white fluffy stuffing on the floor from another toy that Archie has killed. The pile of toys needing repair is growing. Archie is non stop, he runs around the house and jumps up onto the couch, then down, runs around the couch to the hall and back again. Archie is a puppy at heart. We love him to death!

Archie enjoying the fireHere Archie is taking a rare break to enjoy the warmth of the fire before taking off through the house again. As you can see, Archie has to remove all the toys from the bin.

Archie surveying the damageArchie is living life! And he should! He is a sweet dog that certainly deserves the perfect home. Luckily for Archie we have a few homes lined up. Archie certainly has a Doxie personality. His big nose, floppy ears and huge front paws are shadowed by his tremendous personality. He certainly is a sweet, sweet boy!

In the world of dog rescue, Archie is the kind of story we all like; he came to us very sick, he was treated by some great Doctor’s, he was nursed back to health and made a great recovery and is now ready for his very own forever home. Archie is now living life to it’s fullest! We will continue to post his progress here. I just want to thank everyone again; from   New Life Rescue (who made the commitment to help him), to the Doctor’s and staff at University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, for his great care, to the Doctor’s and staff at Voorhees Veterinarian Hospital (for his post Heart Worm follow up care), and to everyone who has kept Archie in your thoughts and prayers, we could not have been able to help this precious guy. Some times it takes a village to save a life. Of course to those special people who have opened there hearts and homes, by offering a forever home to Archie. We are very honored to have been able to help Archie, he is very special. Thank you all.

February 23, 2014,

Archie had his new buddy Blue over today for a play date. Blue’s Mom is going to be adopting Archie and they are getting along great! We could not have hoped for a better match. With all the dogs here, Archie naturally migrates over to Blue when they all are outside in the yard. Blue seems to like the companionship of Archie next to him. When Blue is in his Mom’s lap, he doesn’t seem to mind Archie climbing up and sitting next him in Mom’s lap either. This looks like it is going to be a great and lasting relationship.

March 4, 2014,  Archie went to his new forever home today! Archie has an awesome new Mom and an awesome new brother Blue! Lets wish Archie a great new life! He is a very deserving dog. Best wishes to Archie and his new family!

IMG_5372 IMG_5373Thank you everyone for your kind thoughts and prayers! This could not have happened with each and everyone of you!

 

 

Who Are We? Daisy’s Rescue podcast Episode 1

Daisy’s Rescue Podcast Episode 1

“Who Are We?”

Welcome everyone to the very first podcast of Daisy’s Rescue. This podcast marks a mile stone and the step to the next level in Daisy’s Rescue’s evolution. On November 7, 2013, Daisy’s Rescue had another mile stone achievement, 1,000 views on the blog. Before I get into What Daisy’s Rescues is and how it got started, I just wanted to explain to you a summery of what is in this podcast.

This is Charlie Moe the voice of Daisy’s Rescue, I will tell you who I am, who Daisy is and how Daisy’s Rescue came to be. What Daisy’s Rescue means to me and why I’m hosting podcasts. I’ll talk about what the benefits to me are and more importantly, what the benefits to you are. Why you should keep listen and what you will get out of listening.

Prior to creating Daisy’s Rescue blog and now podcasts, I read and listened to people who are already doing blogs and podcasts and one thing that was very important to me was transparency and honesty. I want everyone to know why things are being done and to be able to help you. I want this podcast to be of help to you and not to waste your time. The pod casts are going to be long enough to cover the topic, but not so long as to bore you. The podcasts will be a combination of just me talking and or guest interviews. Since these are for you, please leave comments, tell us your experiences and what you would like to hear in the future. Thank you for listening to Daisy’s Rescue, A resource page for Dog Rescue and care.

I’m Charlie Moe, I’m the main person behind Daisy’s Rescue. A quick bio on me. I have a Ba in History, I like medieval European history and architecture. I work as a Paramedic and have been doing so for a number of years. I have a lot of intercity in the trenches 911 experience.

I’m very passionate about dog rescue and animal rights. It all started few years ago, when we wanted to get a playmate for our puppy Tucker, a mini longhaired Dachshund. We applied to the Dachshund Rescue of North America, we looked at a few dogs and when we had our home visit, the lady doing the visit said that we would be the perfect family for a special dog in Illinois. She wasn’t necessarily the best dog for us, as a playmate for Tucker, but we were perfect for her. We agreed and Daisy was adopted by us. We drove 10 hours west to meet another member of the Dachshund Rescue of North America, whom had just drove 5 hours to get Daisy for us.

Daisy is a beautiful Black and Tan Piebald long haired Dachshund. Her picture is the one on the blog site, the black and white Dachshund. Pie bald means that while she is a black and tan, she is missing the gene that gives her the tan pigment in her fur, so where ever the tan should be she is white. But in reality the white really isn’t white either, it is a lack of pigment and a total lack of color is white. Now, Daisy spent 4 years in a puppy mill, pumping out puppies. When the puppy miller was done with her he took her to a high kill shelter to be killed. A lady there at the shelter called the DRNA and she was pulled and fostered. When Daisy’s foster Mom first saw her, she felt that Daisy was so abused that they may not be able to help her, but she would try anyway. Daisy probably had over 8 litters in her four short years in the mill, stuck in a cage, starving, cold, no contact, abused and neglected. Having her babies ripped away from her at too young an age. The realities of puppy mills hit home with us.

When we adopted Daisy, it was 3 months after she was rescued. She had come along way in those three months, but she still had a long way to go. When we first brought her home, we needed to keep a leash on her, because she would not come to us, but after a couple of day I, took the leash and harness off her. My feeling was, this was her forever home and she would not be harnessed in her own home. Slowly Daisy realized that she was home and that no one would ever hurt her again. She would slowly come to us and then stiffen up when we touched her. She no doubt was waiting for a beating or to be abused in some way, having flash backs. Slowly we worked with her, always respecting her space, but also showing her that we were not going to harm her. One of the biggest accomplishments Daisy made was to allow me to brush her when she was eating. Daisy loves to be brushed. Even though Daisy was well loved and taken care of by her foster, she still had a lot of healing to do, both physically and psychologically. Her belly was bald when we first got her, probably due to having puppies and being malnourished. We bought her the best dog food money could by, after all Daisy is worth it. Soon her belly fur started to grow again. Daisy had a hard time going outside when we first adopted her, now she loves to go out in our huge yard and just walk around in the grass sniffing all the smells. She wanders around the yard with her nose to the ground, following the scents. Then when the urge strikes her, she we just start to run through the grass. She loves to lay in the warm sun in the summer and relax, just sun bathing. It took her at least a year before she would start to play with toys, watching Tucker as a model. Then all of a sudden Daisy started to play with toys. Daisy makes big strides in her evolution and then she maintains for while, then she will make another huge stride forward. Playing with toys was one of Daisy bigger accomplishments. Today, Daisy is one of the biggest toy hoarders. She just adores fluffy squeaky toys. The squeaker the better. She loves to kill the squeakers. I have a bag of spare squeakers, that I routinely replace. It’s been 3 years now and Daisy has made the transition into becoming the beautiful dog she was always meant to be. She was saved from the brink of death  by the DRNA and has become a very loved and cherished member of our family. Daisy is now the Alpha female of the pack. She is very quiet and you would never know it looking at her, but no one messes with Daisy. Daisy gets what she wants with the other dogs. Daisy has travelled a long and hard road and while she has made amazing strides, she still has a long way to go.

Daisy is the reason we got into rescue. Daisy has made me passionate about dog rescue and animal advocacy. After we adopted Daisy and saw how many people had volunteered and worked hard to help Daisy and get Daisy to us, we wanted to give back and to pay it forward as a token of our gratitude for the opportunity to adopt and welcome Daisy into our home, family and hearts. We started in rescue slowly. First by transporting other Dachshunds to their forever homes for the DRNA, and then we started expanding to help other rescues transport there dogs as well. During this time, we learned more about rescues and more about puppy mills. We learned from other rescuers and we networked with other rescues. When we felt we were ready, we moved into fostering Dachshunds for the DRNA. When we started fostering, I wanted to use my medic skills with the dogs and we wanted to eventually move to fostering sick and injured dogs. We developed a great relationship with our veterinarian and now we work great together. I do most of the nursing and follow up care on my foster dogs, under my veterinarian’s guidance. Duchess was my second foster Dachshund. She was a sweet old lady who’s family died on her twice. She was a beautiful Black and Tan soft wire hair, that means she is a long hair, but her fur is wavy. We ended up adopt this sweet old lady. Duchess was our failed foster. We felt that with all Duchess had been through, she was home with us and Duchess was worth every second of it. Sadly Duchess had passed on July 5, 2013, we think she was 15 or so. She had, had mammary tumor’s, three of which were removed, horrible dental problems, she had 9 teeth removed, she developed a fistula that went from her mouth into her sinus cavity and had to have that fixed as well. Then Duchess developed Chushing’s disease and had a slight back injury with severe arthritis. She lived with us for a little over 2 years. We miss her dearly. She was an integral part of the pack, involved in every aspect of our daily activities. Duchess showed us determination and how to have a zest for life no matter what. Duchess taught us a lot about life and that Senior Dogs are truly deserving of a great life. It is Duchess that has made me committed to helping Seniors, injured and sick dogs. Duchess has left a mark in our hearts and an emptiness in our souls and our pack.

During our transports and fostering, while we had a member over see us, we still made a lot of mistakes and learned a lot of things the hard way. We also learned a lot from other rescuers. From fostering dogs, we then decided to make another step into rescue and become members of the Dachshund Rescue of North America. With membership in the DRNA, came an orientation class and a mentor. Of course even with a mentor we still had a lot to learn. We continue to make mistakes, but we are willing to learn from other rescuers and that’s how the concept of Daisy’s Rescues, A Resource Page for Dog Rescue and Care came to be. I wanted a central location where rescuer’s could come and share tricks of the trade and their experiences with other rescuer’s, so others didn’t have to learn things the hard way and make mistakes. I also wanted ordinary people to come to the site and get tips on how to take care of their dogs. When I do home visits for rescues, I like to talk to the future adopter about basic dog care and the responsibilities of a Guardian. I talk about the commitment that must be understood and made before adopting a dog. On many occasions I have had future adopters tell me, that I really explained things in details and made it easy for them to understand and that I emphasized certain aspects of care that was very important, but many veterinarians just glossed over. They told me that I should start a dog care website to help people understand how to better take care of their dogs.

Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource Page For Dog Rescue And Care, takes on both those challenges, a resource page for both rescuers and guardians. I like the word guardian better than owner, as owner to me, down grades the positions of dogs into a possession and not a living breathing being. My goal is that rescues will encourage their foster families and new adopters to use the site as a resource. Daisy’s Rescue is a place for rescuers to network and share experiences, tips and information. Daisy’s Rescue is a place where Guardian’s can come and learn how to take care of their dog, network with other Guardian’s and share ideas.

When the blogs are written, I and or my guests may list products, these products are there so if you like the article and want to purchase or research that product, there is a direct link to that product to make it easier for you to find it. If you decide to buy that product, we will get a small percentage of the sale price for “advertising”, that money is used to fund the site and the podcasts. In the future, when our following is huge, there maybe some advertising banners, again these will before stuff that we like and or use, you know the stuff we would recommend to our families and friends.

The bottom line is, this web site and the podcasts are for you, to help you and ultimately for the dogs. Our goal is to help improve the lives of dogs everywhere. We need your help. We want you to read and or listen to the articles and podcasts. We want the articles to be interesting, so you keep coming back. We are going to feature products we use and like, so you know they are good and work. We welcome feed back, on how we are doing. We want to know what you want, from us, what you want hear and read in the future. We want to hear any experiences that you have. We can all learn from this interaction.

Our show format is going to be simple. We are going to run podcasts and blog articles that are just long enough to cover the topic and short enough to keep you interested. We are going to keep each session to one topic, so it is simple and not confusing and easy to search. We want the content to be pertinent to what you are doing, you should be able to finish reading and or listening and apply what was said. We want your feed back to tell us what is working and what isn’t. I can’t stress this enough, this is your website, your podcast, everything here is to help you!

I was listening to one podcaster and he talked about Karma. We are hosting podcasts and blogs to help dogs. The more we help others, the more that comes back to us. Karma is a wonderful thing, it can really help you, if you are honest and up front or it can really haunt you if you are deceitful. WE want to take the high road and help as many dogs as possible. That is why we are transparent and honest, we don’t have any hidden agenda, we want to help dogs, we advertise to pay for the cost of the website and podcasts. In the future if we have advertising banners and make enough for us to dive into dog rescue full time, that would be great. But, it is all about the dogs and the people who help them.

We are starting podcasts to increase our following. People will listen to a 40 minute podcast more than they will sit down and read a 1,000 word blog. Plus you can listen to the podcast while driving to work. So, after this podcast, I will go back and start converting older blogs into podcasts and post them. In the future, all blogs will be podcast a all podcasts will be blogged. I’m not sure if I will transcript the podcast into a blog, word for word or narrate the podcast in the blog. We will have to see which works better.

We have a Facebook page so that you can follow us and join that page, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . We have a twitter page www.twitter.com/daisysrescue . Our own website www.daisysrescue.com . You can email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net .

We try to help rescues out by featuring dogs on wednesdays on www.daisysrescue.com , under the dogs menu and Seniors on Sundays, under the Seniors menu. We have an events page where rescues can lists their events and a rescue page, where rescues can ask to be listed. For those other animal advocates we have an other rescue page as well.

This is all for you and the dogs. Please visit and down load us often and please refer us to your friends. www.daisysrescue.com

Daisy’s Rescue, has a dog and pet supply portal for all of your dog and pet care needs. We also have a “generic” Amazon portal, where you can go and buy anything on Amazon and we will get the advertising fee. Remember we are here for you and the dogs.

This is Charlie Moe saying thank you for listening to Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource for Dog Rescue and Care Podcast 1 and we look forward to hearing from you. Take Care and thank you for helping the dogs.

Link to Daisy’s Rescue Podcast Episode 1http://www.podcastgarden.com/podcast/daisysrescueepisode1

Daisy’s Rescue is now on ITunes! Catch our first Podcast. Here is the linkhttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/daisys-rescue-episode-1/id756986926

Help stop Iowa University from teaching how to start Puppy Mills

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about trying to stop future puppy mills from starting up. Iowa State University has created a course on how to start and run puppy mills. I wrote them an email and they have not replied. I made a few Dog Advocate’s aware of what is going on and a petition was created. The author of the petition wrote to the Iowa University and this is what was written and done.

As I think you know, I posted a petition on Change.org objecting to a course in Commercial Dog Breeding offered by the Iowa State University School of Veterinary Medicine.  The director of the program that teaches the courseposted this comment to the petition:
The materials on Regulatory Compliance for Commercial Dog Breeders were developed by the Center for Food Security and Public Health with funding from the United States Department of Agriculture. The USDA has authority to regulate commercial dog breeders under the Animal Welfare Act. The web-based materials on Regulatory Compliance for Commercial Dog Breeders are used by the USDA to help enforce the Animal Welfare Act. Being aware of the regulations discourages some people from becoming commercial dog breeders. Removing the materials from the website would result in less compliance with animal welfare standards by commercial dog breeders, and more people becoming dog breeders. We do not want that outcome.
I posted this reply:
Thank you for your very thoughtful reply. I am glad that we agree that we don’t want less compliance with animal welfare standards and more dog breeders. I also understand your rationale for this course. What I think you overlook, however, is that by offering the course you are giving legitimacy and validation to a practice that shouldn’t exist at all.
We need to let Iowa State University know that we do not want more puppy mills and we don’t want them teaching people to “commercially Farm dogs”. When there are 4 million dogs murdered each year, we do not need any more breeders to add to the over population.
Thank you from Daisy’s Rescue. We rely on our followers to make the difference.

 

 

Signs… Signs… Everywhere Are Signs!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Making signs for that Protest or “Education” Campaign.

I’ve been part of some “education” campaigns that were about Puppy Mill Awareness. Everything was all set up, the organization was done. The time and place was set. Everyone was briefed and then you show up and …. you have nothing to hold. Well today we are going to explain how you can get signs at a very low cost. If fact most cases there is no cost.

In October and November of every year in the US, we have a series of events…called elections. This is a good thing, because these are going to be your source of signs.  Many towns across the US have passed laws that required politicians to remove all their campaign signs with in a few days after the elections. This is where you come in. You can ask the politician’s by calling their office and asking to remove the signs for them (again after the election). I usually wait a few days and I pick up signs that have been left out and forgotten about. I’m not telling you to steal the signs or do anything Illegal, saying that there are many unwanted signs that are now trash that can be recycled for use to help save dogs lives. A few years ago, I was picking up signs in the end of November. I had about 15 to 20 that were along back roads that everyone forgot about. I stopped and picked them up and drove away. I helped the politician, by removing the sign, and helping him comply with the law.

Signs advertising political candidates.
Signs advertising political candidates.

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The signs come in many sizes and shapes. Some of them are the more expensive kind, are  corrugated plastic with a metal wire “H”. The “H” goes into the ground and the sign goes on the “H” wire. If you were to purchase these sign yourself, they might cost about $3.00 a sign and you have a minimum order of 100 (Corrugated Plastic 4MM WHITE Sign Blanks – 24″x18″ BNDL/25 , and Standard “H” Frame Wire Stakes (Pkg of 25/$.95 ea) – Yard Sign Stake – Use with 4mm Corrugated Signs). The cheaper signs are printed poster paper folded over a “N” frame and staple together so it stays on. Surprisingly, they are pretty weather resistant. I have not priced these signs if you were to purchase them, but they should be cheaper.

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Once you have a nice collection of signs, it is time to repurpose them. The first thing you need to do is cover the politicians name. I have found that you need to use a gray or white primer spray paint to cover the sign. I like to use Krylon Semi-Flat White spray paint, because you can re-coat at any time, unlike Rust-Oleum (Rust-Oleum 12 oz. Spray, Flat Light Gray Primer), which requires you to re-coat before 1 hour or after 48 hours. Once the signs are primed, you can cover them with a flat white paint.

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I use about 2 inch stencils to write my message. You can use black paint, or a color to bring attention to your sign. After all the stenciling is done, you can spray a different bright color around the edges of the sign or leave it white. I then spray the sign again with clear gloss to protect the sign (Krylon Crystal Clear Gloss Spray Enamel).
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I like to keep my messages generic , so I can use them at more than one protest or education campaign. If you make them specific to a store, you are committing those signs to that campaign. That can be ok, but if you work with a few different groups or a group that has a couple campaigns, you are now required to have a few signs. When you are thinking about your message, you have to remember that, your audience is driving by at speeds that are not going to allow them to see small detailed messages that are paragraphs. They are going to be able to read two to three lines of large type. Be careful about using pictures. I was on one protest and the group had expensive large signs of horribly abused and neglected dogs pictures. They thought they were the greatest thing. Problem, people driving by saw these horrible pictures of dogs, nothing else. These people did not associate the signs with the pet store or puppy mills, they only saw a bunch of pictures that “Those crazy animal rights people” were showing.  Because they saw the pictures only, they were of no use to educate the public. It’s more important to get your message across in a clear fashion, rather than the “shock” value of an abused dogs. You want people to associate your sign and message with the store or subject of your  campaign.

Good luck! DO NOT Steal any signs, always ask permission! Now you have a economic way to make signs for your campaigns. If anyone has any other tips and suggestions, please let us know. We love sharing your comments. Remember you can get all your shopping needs through our amazon portal.

Follow us on Face Book @ www.facebook.com/daisysrescue , follow us on twitter DaisysRescuse,  daisysrescue@comcast.net

 

 

What’s That Smell? How To Clean Those Accidents

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about taking care of those accidents that happen from time to time.

We all want to have our dogs house broken, but from time to time our dogs have an accident. Whether we were away from the house too long, or maybe our dog is older and has a problem holding their bladder until we can take them out side, accidents do happen. We are going to look at what causes the smell and how we can clean up the mess. I will say that some breeds of dogs are much harder to train then others.

Having said all that, I wanted to get some good information that actually works on those stubborn, smelling dog pee stains. After spending some time on the web, I found that the same 4 ingredients kept coming up: Baking Soda, Vinegar, Dish Soap, and Hydrogen peroxide. So basically you have 3 options to clean those stains.

1. There is the “Home Made Pee Spray” method. 2. The commercially available enzyme / oxy clean pee spray. 3. The use of a carpet cleaning machine.

Here is the “Home Made Pee Spray” method.

You need to gather the following items.

1.  Baking Soda,  2. White Vinegar,  3. Dawn Dish Soap, 4. Hydrogen Peroxide Solution.

I also recommend  Pet Pads, instead of paper towels. In fact, using human “Chux” under pads may be cheaper.

Lets get down to business. Sometimes you can actually see the urine stain on the floor. Sometimes you can see invisible urine stains with a black light or ultraviolet light. I use a small pen light that is made by  Streamlight (police use the same type to check ID’s). There are other ultra violet lights on the market as well, that you can use, Portable 6 inch Blacklight is one of them. Now I have had some really smelly stains and not be able to see them either with the naked eye or the backlight. When that happens I resort back to my old stand by, my nose. I get right down on my hands and knees and sniff the carpet until I find the offensive area. Once I have found it, I attack it with one of the above methods. I really don’t have a favorite and I find that one doesn’t work universally, so I keep a few on hand.

We will start with the home made do it yourself stink remover.

1. Once you found the spot, if it is still wet, use the pee pad to remove the excess pee from the rug. I put the absorbent side down and I step on the spot. I move the pee pad slightly and step on the spot again. I do this until I can no longer see the spot being absorbed onto the pee pad. Don’t Move the pee pad yet!

2. Get the water and the vinegar together and mix 50/50. Now removes the pee pad so you know where the spot is. Spray the spot, almost soaking the spot. I let it sit for about 1 or 2 minutes and then I get a clean pee pad and soak up the water and vinegar mixture just like before. Leaving the pee pad over the spot so I can find it.

3. This step has two variations. Variation1. Wait until the spot is dry and then cover by sprinkling baking soda over the spot. Then mix 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide and 1 teaspoon of dish soap together and then pour over the baking soda and work in deep into the carpet and then let dry. Variation 2. Mix 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide and 1 teaspoon of dish soap together and pour over the spot, saturate the spot and then pour baking soda over the spot and work in deep into the carpet. Then let dry.

4. Once dry vacuum the powder and the stain and the smell should be history.

Commercially available Pee spray method.

1. Find the spot (using the same techniques as listed above. Eyes, UV light or nose).

2. Spray one of two types of sprays, I’m currently using OUT! Pet Stain and Odor Remover,    and  OUT! Oxygen Activated Pet Stain & Odor Remover. There is actually a third that I have not used yet, OUT! Orange Oxy Pet Stain and Odor Remover, 32 oz.Of course there are other brands that you can buy and use. If you have a favorite, leave a comment about it. Now you spray the spot until wet. Most will say allow the spot to stay wet for about 10 minutes, then remove the moisture with a pee pad and stepping on the stain until the pee pad stops absorbing the moisture.

3. Allow to dry. Smell and stain should be gone.

The last and most aggressive stain remover is the carpet cleaner!

You can rent one from the local super market or you can buy one. Since I have Dachshunds and I foster, I bought one. Actually I have bought 3, two broke and the third is relatively new. I started out with the BISSELL ProHeat 2X Healthy Home Full Sized Carpet Cleaner, 66Q4, it worked well and we had it for a few years and then we broke the plastic “dome” where the water is sucked up. It wasn’t a defect or a matter of wear, it was a matter of dropping and stepping on it. So then we bought the BISSELL DeepClean Lift-Off Full Sized Carpet Cleaner, 66E1, in concept this would be great if you cleaned a lot of cars or had a lot of steps, or even small stains, but I really didn’t think it worked as good as the previous Bissell when it was together and we ended up breaking the hand held wand when it was apart. The hose tore and made the unit unusable. So I went out and did some research and found the  Hoover MaxExtract 60 PressurePro Carpet Deep Cleaner, FH50220, so far I like this the best. It has a unique feature where it blows dry warm air over the carpet to dry it faster. When ever you use a carpet cleaner you need to use hot water and of course rug shampoo. Each maker has their brand of shampoos in different formulas. Choose the formula you think that will do the best job.

1. Locate the spot using the techniques above.

2. I like to pretreat the spot with either the vinegar and water mix or the commercial sprays.  Then I prepare the machine.

3. I like to go over the carpet about 4 times with the hot water/solution spraying the area. Then I go back over the area with just the machine suctioning up the water and dirt. I do this until I can’t see any more water being sucked up. I do my entire rug this way. I do small stains this way too with the hand held nozzle. After all is said and done, your rug should smell better and the stain should be gone.

Sometimes, the stains return even if the dog has not reused the spot. I’m not a carpet expert, but I have been told, that this is because the stain has soaked into the bottom of the carpet and or the carpet pad may need to be removed and or replaced.

I’m not sure why some pee stains glow under a UV light. I couldn’t find a definite answer on the web, but I’m going to go out on a limb and say it is because of the phosphorous content of the urine. The UV light makes the phosphorous glow, thats also why some white shirts and shoe laces glow as well. Below are three pee stains, two are invisible, but glow under UV light and the third is a visible stain that does not glow.

This is an invisible pee stain stain. Invisible Pee stain

This is the same stain under UV Light UV Pee Stain

This is a visible stain Visible Pee Stain

This is the same visible stain under UV light with no other lights on (no glow)Visible Pee Stain Under UV

This is an invisible stain Another Invisible Stain

This is the same stain under UV light (glow). Another Pee Stain under UV light

 

If you have a secret to how you remove stains, please let us know so we can share. We welcome all comments.

Thank you for visiting Daisy’s Rescue

www.daisysrescue.com , wwwfacebook.com/daisysrescue , daisysrescue@comcast.net

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New Features on Daisy’s Rescue

Hello everyone,

Here at Daisy’s Rescue, we are always trying to help you and rescues. We are now featuring dogs from rescue’s that are looking for their forever homes. We are asking rescues to send us a picture of the dog they would like us to feature. At this time we are requesting just one dog from each rescue at this time. We are hoping to make this a regular feature. More importantly we are hoping to help some very deserving dogs find homes.

Another feature that we are trying to establish is “Senior Sunday”. Here are are going to feature Senior dogs that need forever homes. Senior’s are great dogs and deserve a nice loving home to spend their retirement. Please help us make this happen! We are asking all dog rescues to send us a picture and a bio of a deserving Senior and we will feature them every Sunday on our site.

These features are important to us, we really want to help dogs get their forever homes, but we need your help! If you are a rescue, if you know of a rescue, if you know some one who knows someone who knows a rescue, have them contact us and or send us a picture and bio on a Senior.

This wed site, Daisy’s Rescue, was created to help you, the everyday, down in the trenches dog rescuer and the everyday ordinary to extraordinary dog companion. The articles here are to help each other learn and make life easier for all of us involved in rescue or the care of a dog. We welcome comments, we welcome ideas, please share your experiences. If you share your experience and it keeps me from making a mistake or doing something a harder way, then we have succeeded. I can’t stress this enough, this site is here for you, for all of us, with the goal of taking better care of dogs.

There are so many people out there that are doing extraordinary things, helping dogs. From protesting pet stores selling puppy mill puppies to adopting and caring for special needs dogs, we want to hear your story, your experiences, the way you do things. Future articles are going to contain info on how to set up a protest, how to get the supplies needed for protests, how to make complaints against puppy mills, how to prepare to be a foster family, how to set up dog transports, and much much more. We plan to have interviews with some really amazing people telling their stories. This is an exciting time for Daisy’s Rescue as we continue to gain a following each and every day. We could not be here without you. Thank you for all of your continued support! Please keep doing what your doing to help dogs! Please keep spreading the word and share Daisy’s Rescue with your friends and fellow rescuers. You can follow us by email, Facebook and twitter.

Thank you,

Daisy

www.daisysrescue.com  daisysrescue@comcast.net, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

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