More Home Made Treats

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about making healthy all natural treats.

With all the problems that are going on with treats and dog food made in China, it’s time to start making our own dog treats. I know what goes in them and how they were made. Today, we are going to make sweet potato treats and pumpkin treats. There are two kinds of sweet potato treats, chewy and crunchy. We will start with the pumpkin treats.

What you will need: a dehydrator, I like the Nesco American Harvest FD-61 Snackmaster Encore Dehydrator and Jerky Maker,

IMG_7797IMG_7798IMG_7796

it is a really nice machine that has a fan to circulate the hot air and speed drying time, and adjustable temperature too. A box of 5 pounds of sweet potato’s and a pumpkin or two. A deep baking pan and a large pot to boil water. A sharp knife or two and a mandolin slicer if you want and an ice cream scoop for the pumpkin.

This is really easy. You find a fresh pumpkin at the store and bring it home. Cut it in half. Clean out the seeds, then cut it into strips of a few inches wide. Prepare a deep baking pan by filling it with 2 inches of water. Now pre-heat the oven to 375. Put the slices into the pan and place the pan in the oven for about 15 to 20 minutes. This will soften the pumpkin and allow the soft flesh to be removed from the outer rind. After 20 minutes, test the pumpkin to see if the flesh is soft. Remove the pumpkin slices and place on a plate to cool. I use an ice cream scoop to separate the soft flesh from the rind. I pile the pumpkin in a bowl or on another plate. I take the pumpkin and I put it in my hand and I roll out the pumpkin like a “hot dog” and place it on the dehydrator tray. You could make “cookies” as well. What ever shape you would like.

IMG_7809The orange mis-shaped things are the pumpkin treats. I’m sorry that I don’t have photo’s of the pumpkin preparation, I prepared the pumpkin a few weeks prior to writing this.

Next are the sweet potato treats. Around Thanksgiving, most food stores sell the potato’s in 5 pound boxes really cheap.

IMG_7754Now,get a big pot and boil some water. Put about 3/4 of the pot full of water. Now take the sweet potato and get a sharp knife. Slice the potato like a salami, I like 3/16 to a 1/4 inch thick slices. Remember, these will shrink, so don’t worry about the thickness. I also take a few potato’s and slice them longways, like a filet. Again, make them about 1/4 thick. If you have a mechanical slicer like a mandolin slicer, you can use that too. I find they tend to slice too thin and make sweet potato chips.

IMG_7761IMG_7767

IMG_7779Now if you want to make chewy treats, dump some of the potato slices in the boiling water and let them stay for about 10 minutes or so. This is not a precise operation, so the time is not to critical.

IMG_7803You will see the potato become a brighter orange.

IMG_7806The top slice is raw and the bottom slice is boiled. As you remove the boiled slices from the water, put them directly on to the dehydrator trays.

IMG_7807IMG_7805The nice thing with this dehydrator is that you have to have a minimum of 4 trays in place to operate, but you can add trays up to 12. You don’t want the slices to over lap. When all the trays are filled, it’s time to set the temperature.

IMG_7810We will use the fruits and vegetables setting at 135 degrees.

IMG_7811We put the top on and plug it in and you can hear the fan start blowing and now we wait for 9 hours or so. Again, this is not an exact operation, so if you want them drier, keep it on longer.

After 9 hours, I lift the top and see how things are coming along. This batch of treats came out great. Now I have all the dogs at my feet patiently waiting for me to drop one or two. This is the first time that I made the pumpkin treats. Luckily, I have some more pumpkin frozen, so I can make more. My dogs really love the pumpkin treats.

I was able to make 4 sandwich baggies and two quart baggies worth of treats. Let us know how you made out with your treat making.

On a side note, you need a sharp knife. I have been using this knife sharpener for years, it works great and I highly recommend it. The Edge Maker Knife Sharpener

IMG_7785IMG_7787You just put the sharpener on the edge of the counter and then you just run the blade through the metal prongs, like your trying to slice through it.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on  ITunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

emails us @ daisysrescue@comcast.net www.daisysrescue.com

 

 

 

 

Does Your Canned Food Hold “Water” ? Yes It Does…

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Canned dog food and how you can compare it to Dry dog food. We have guest writer Mark Whitney, Certified Canine Nutritionist and head of West Chester Canine Nutrition. Mark brings his 25 years of experience to Daisy’s Rescue to help shed some light on nutrition for your dog.

Does Your Canned Food Hold “Water”? Yes It Does…

I get this one often “My Vet wants me to put my dog on canned food because my dog has blah, blah, blah and he/she instructed me to buy canned food because it’s a LOW protein and/or LOW fat and that will help with my problem”  Unfortunately (and a little frightening…) this is untrue!!! I always like to assume they heard their Vet incorrectly…(it helps me sleep at night). At first glance that statement may seem to hold “water”…but therein lies the problem. All canned foods contain anywhere from 70% to 85% water which is an important factor when reading the nutrient level and how your dogs body handles and breaks down those nutrients.

That’s because pet food companies report the nutrient content of their products using something known as
Guaranteed Analysis. The Guaranteed Analysis is the dog food industry’s version of the Nutrition Facts panel printed on every package of human food sold in North America.
According to AAFCO rules, the guaranteed analysis must consist of the following:

  •  Minimum Percentage of Protein
  •  Minimum Percentage of Fat
  •  Maximum Percentage of Fiber
  •  Maximum Percentage of Moisture

But when using this method can be misleading.
That’s because the system used for reporting the percentages fails to consider water content
Even the Food and Drug Administration admits to the importance of this problem on its own website…Interpreting Pet Food Labels FDA

“To make meaningful comparisons of nutrient levels between a canned and dry product, they should be expressed on the same moisture basis.”

Let’s me show you how you can choose a better option for your dog.

How to Calculate Dry Matter Basis

The formula is quite simple.

Percentage of Guaranteed Analysis Component Divided by Percentage of Dry Matter
Multiplied by 100

Assuming a can of dog food contains:

  •  9% protein
  •  4% fat
  •  1% fiber
  •  81% moisture

At first glance, 9% protein looks on the very low side compared to dry dog food. Now watch this number after we convert it.
1.  Calculate the dry matter of the canned food by deducting the moisture
percentage (81%) from 100.   i.e. 100 – 81 = 19% or .19
2.  Now, using this dry matter figure of .19 apply the formula to each of
the components, as follows:
Protein: 9 divided by .19= 47.4%
Fat: 4 divided by .19= 21%
Fiber: 1 divided by .19= 5.3%
Notice the protein percentage now. Not really a LOW Protein and/or LOW Fat that you may have been looking for huh? You will find in many cases, canned dog food values tend to exceed that of dry dog food.

At first glance the dry kibble looks to be higher protein and fat compared to its canned counterpart. Take a look at the protein values after converting the data to dry matter basis…
pastedGraphic.pdf
Can you see how the canned product now lists 40% protein, compared to kibble’s 26% figure?
If you had simply followed your vets suggestion and chose the canned food because of its lower protein and lower fat content, you’d have been wrong.
The wet food actually contains much more protein and fat (on a dry matter basis) than does the kibble.

The Bottom Line

Don’t be fooled by a dog food label’s protein or fat numbers. And remember, numbers are just numbers. They can’t reveal the true quality (or the digestibility) of the product’s proteins or fats.
Be sure to take the time to look over the ingredients list. Your dog will surely be better off for your effort.

Thank you Mark. Hopfully this sesion has given you some insight on how to buy the best dog food for your dog. Mark can be contacted at info@dubcpet.com or you can call 610-314-6124. Mark’s company is West Chester Canine Nutrition.

Don’t forget to like Daisy’s Rescue Face Book Page .   facebook.com/daisysrescue

 

So You Want To Be In Rescue?

So you want to rescue dogs, huh? The first thing you need to do is ask youself why? If you are looking to help dogs for any other reason, then to make a dogs life better, then please find another hobby. Make no mistakes; dog rescue is ALL about the DOGS! My stock response to anyone who ask’s about why I rescue, is, “it’s all about the dogs”! I look at rescue like this; no matter how inconvenient it is for me to help a dog, when one needs to be helped, what I go through is nothing compared to what is happening to the dog at that moment. One thing is true and constant, you will be called upon to rescue a dog in need, at the most inconvenient time you can think of! So, what do you do? You go get that dog, that’s what you do! Why? Because that dog needs you! Even if you do not have the time, the room, the money or the ability, you go help the dog! Your in rescue NOW! And it is not about you anymore, It’s all about the dog! So get out there and help that dog (but, please read this first, so you know how).

The very first thing you need to realize, is that these dogs are scared, confused and depressed. Their entire world as they know it has turned upside down! I can not stress this enough. These dogs are under a lot of stress. You are not going to see the dogs true personality. They just lost their home, their family, they may be neglected and abused, hungry, or hurt. They are in a strange place, confinded and they are scared and stressed. These dogs need understanding and gentle handling. You must however, protect yourself at all times! The dog has enough issues at this point and being labeled a biter is something that the dog does not need and you can prevent it from happening. Remember, you are here to protect that dog, not cause more harm. Positioning yourself in such a way as to allow the dog to bite you or provoking a bite,  regardless if you meanrt to or not, is unacceptable.

Why do we rescue? Simply put, because the dogs need our help. The big picture is; every year, four million dogs are murdered, because they do not have a home. No other reason, but they are homeless. Now, having said that, millions of other dogs are purposely murdered each year in labs across the US. Here dogs are tortured, starved, experimented upon and out right killed in the name of product testing and medical research. Sadly, it is very hard to help those dogs as the labs keep tight reign on themselves and do not allow information about what they do to become public.

So, with four million dogs murdered each year why even try to save any? It’s obvious that no matter how hard we try, we won’t even make a dent in the numbers. That is absolutely correct! We won’t, but here is a story that accurately explains why we become so dedicated to rescuing dogs.

It was a beautiful summer day, the sky was an amazing shade of bright blue. Big puffy cotton white clouds floated by over head. This was the stuff of our childhood dreams, the beach was a brilliant shade of white. The water dazzling shade of turquoise, gently lapping the white sandy beach. Littering the beach were tiny star fish. You could barely walk on the beach without stepping on the star  fish. Walking along the beach was a man. While he was walking he was picking up star fish, as many as he could hold and was gently tossing them back into the ocean. Further down the beach was another man standing watching the first man tossing the star fish. As the man tossing the star fish approached, the other man said; “aren’t you wasting your time? With all the thousands of star fish laying on this beach, what difference is it going to make, by throwing back a few hundred star fish into the ocean?” the Man looked down and picked up a star fish. He held it and looked at it, then he looked at the other and said “it makes all the difference in the world for this star fish”, and he proceeded to toss it into the ocean. Then he continued walking along the beach tossing more star fish into the ocean.

That story sums up why we are in rescue, to make a world of difference to the dogs we can save, to mourn the loss of those we can not and to work hard to prevent the same from happening in the future. As rescuer’s we shed a lot of tears for those we can not save and it is a constant reminder that we need to work harder to prevent more dogs from being unwanted in the future. Be fore warned your soul will be torn to shreds working in rescue, you will shed a lot of tears and people will think you are crazy, but there is nothing like the feeling you get when you find that perfect home for a deserving dog. You will find that dogs appreciate everything you do for them and they will show it.

The best way to get into dog rescue is to ease yourself into it a little at a time. This allows you to get an understanding of what it is like and what is required. Most of all, it allows you to test the waters and see if you like rescuing dogs, after all this is not for everyone.

My suggestion is to start with transporting dogs, this is a very important job and there are never enough quality people available. While this sounds like an easy boring job, it isn’t by any means. The first thing you need to do, is ‘Google or Yahoo” your favorite breed and the word “rescue” and your state. Example: “Dachshund rescue NJ”. Then you contact the rescue and explain that you want to help transport dogs. If you already have friends rescuing, it should be easier getting started. You will probably be put on a contact list and then you wait. It’s funny, the way rescue transports work is like everyone is a super hero. Everyone goes about their business, and daily life, you have no idea who they are…until! The email or phone call and then everyone goes into rescue mode and the super heroes show up. You will get an email saying on a certain date, a dog from Georgia is going to a forever home in Maine. The travel route will be laid out by the travel coordinator.

The coordinator is the boss of the transport, they are the one’s responsible for that dog getting to it’s destination! The travel route will be broken down in to approximately 1 hour driving blocks with 15 minutes to transfer the dog and to make sure the dog has water and a potty break. Essentially this is a relay race across the county with a dog instead of a baton and there is NO dropping the “baton”.

You sign up for the date and time that you can drive. Then you go to the prearranged meeting area and you wait for the dog to come to you. You secure the paperwork and the dogs belongings and then you secure the dog, you water him and let him go potty, then it’s off to the next meeting point. You give the paperwork over to your relief, you give the dogs belongings over and then you hand the dog over, so they can water and let him go potty. When you receive the dog, you call the transport coordinator and when you transfer the dog, you call the transport coordinator. When you call the transport coordinator, you give a quick report of the status of the dog and if there were any problems. Then you go back home and get reabsorbed into your daily life until the next time.

You must remember that these dogs are stressed, confused and scared. You need to be prepared and treat the dogs as gentle as possible. DO NOT bring your dogs on a transport! DO NOT bring your dogs on a transport! Here is what not to do! I was on a mixed breed transport. We were moving 3 pit bulls from a high kill shelter down south to a foster home up north. The dogs were in the middle of their second day of transport. I had myself and a helper (always try to have two people in a vehicle). We arrived and met the driver of the next leg. She was a tiny older lady that stood 5 foot tall in a subcompact car. There is nothing wrong with being a petite woman in rescue, most of the rescuer’s are women and they do an excellent job. This lady was doing the transport for the first time, no helper, tiny car, 3 mid sized dogs and the ultimate no no! She decided it was a great idea to bring along her 3 unsocialized chihuahua’s! “Are you kidding me?” So we meet, I give her the paperwork, the dogs belonging (which weren’t much, coming from a shelter). The lady then proceeds to tell me she is afraid of pit bulls and if she had known these were pit bulls, she would not have agreed to transport. The transport schedule had descriptions of the dogs and pictures, this way people can make a conscious decision on weather they can do the transport. When you are on location, it is to late to decide you can’t continue the transport. The lady had to take the dogs, because I could not drive a second leg. She packed up the dog’s stuff and then she put the 3 pits into her car and had her 3 chihuahua’s yapping. I called the coordinator and reported what had happened.

The next segment of this blog will contain the things you need to carry with you when you transport dogs.

Daisy

 

Dog Care

Hello, welcome to my dog care section. Here I will be giving tips and explaining how to take better care of your dog. Many people think that having a dog is easy and as simple as bringing the dog into the home and the dog will take care of it’s self. This isn’t the case. Dogs like people need to be taught how to live. Dogs like people have special needs that are specific to them. Being in the rescue business, I have seen first hand, that people don’t always know how to take care of their dog. The idea that dogs are family seem to be new to some people. Dogs are not disposable items that can be ignored until you want to play with them and then ignored again. Dogs are living breathing creatures, that just like people have feelings and emotions. They feel pain and loneliness. Dogs have likes and dislikes and above all are loyal!

I hate bringing a dog in and finding that the people that had the dog neglected it, did not keep up on the medical requirements, did not train or socialize the dog and now wonder why they have problems. So, hopefully this page will help people care for their dogs.