Fly The Friendly Skies… And Die?

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Today’s session is about Flying with your dog.

Every year many people travel and they want to bring their dog. Many people opt to have their dog go in the cargo hold. Supposedly, the airlines will take great care of the dog, kept inside until the last minute and then last to load and first to unload and back into a climate controlled are. Sadly, many pets die each year while traveling. Many dogs die during the transport in the hold. This story is a little different. This dog died because of poor treatment and neglect prior to loading. If this was my dog and I saw what was happening, I would have been very vocal and demand something be done immediately. Here is the story.

By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO (Reuters) – Michael Jarboe of Miami paid extra for special airline dog handlers to ensure the safety of his 2-year-old mastiff, BamBam, on a cross-country flight.

Instead, following a layover in Houston in 90-degree heat, baggage handlers found BamBam dead on arrival in San Francisco.

Just in time for the holiday travel season, a Change.org petition is calling for new federal rules holding airlines responsible for deaths of animals like BamBam. More than 100,000 signatures were logged on Jarboe’s petition as of late Tuesday, more than half of them added in the past two weeks.

Jarboe said one of his goals is to make pet owners aware about the danger of airline travel.

BamBam, who died in 2012, is hardly alone.

Pets flying with their owners are killed, injured or lost on average once every 10 days, according to Mary Beth Melchior, founder of the watchdog group Where Is Jack Inc. who keeps a tally of large carriers’ reports to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Her organization is named for a 5-year-old cat who died in 2011 after being lost for two months in New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

“You run the same risk of losing your pet as you do your luggage,” said Jarboe. “It’s Russian roulette.”

The Humane Society of the United States suggests driving with your pet or leaving your animal at home with a pet sitter before choosing airline travel.

“Air travel can be so quick that you may think a plane is the best way to transport your pet. Think again. Air travel isn’t safe for pets. The HSUS recommends that you do not transport your pet by air unless absolutely necessary,” the organization’s website cautions.

The tragedy of BamBam gained steam at Change.org after the petition was linked to Janet Sinclair’s Facebook page titled “United Airlines Almost Killed My Greyhound” dedicated to her dog Sedona’s flight experience in July.

Sinclair and Jarboe said they both chose to fly with their dogs on United because of its highly regarded Pet Safe program, which was started at Continental Airlines before the carriers’ merger.

Both said the program promised their dogs would be held before and after flights and during layovers in an air-conditioned cargo facility, and transported to and from the planes in an air-conditioned van.

They say the system broke down during layovers in Houston where they say the dogs were left on the tarmac and in non air-conditioned cargo spaces in the summer heat for hours between flights.

“Our goal is the safe and comfortable travel of all the pets that fly with us,” United’s Megan McCarthy said on Tuesday in an emailed response to Reuters concerning the cases.

“On the rare occasion we don’t deliver on that goal, we work with our customers, their vets and our team of vets to resolve the issue,” she added.

Jarboe said he and his partner could see BamBam from their seats on the plane arriving for the second leg of the flight on a luggage cart with baggage handlers, instead of the promised air-conditioned van and special dog handlers.

“We could see right in the kennel. He was standing there swaying there back and forth with his tongue hanging out farther than I’ve ever seen it, drooling,” Jarboe said.

Sinclair said she watched as baggage handlers in Houston “kick Sedona’s crate, kick, kick, kick it six times to get it under the wing and left it there to boil on the tarmac.”

Jarboe said United reported that its autopsy of BamBam was inconclusive after the death, but that his own vet was convinced the dog died of heatstroke. Jarboe said United eventually paid him about $3,770, the price of a new dog and crate.

Sinclair said United agreed to pay Sedona’s hospital bill of about $2,700 for treatment of what the vet diagnosed as heat-stroke and dehydration. But Sinclair said she declined the offer because of an airline condition that she sign a confidentiality agreement.

For holiday travelers thinking about flying with a pet, Jarboe, Sinclair and Melchior offer the same advice: Don’t.

(Editing by David Adams and Doina Chiacu)

The moral of this story is, NEVER put your pet in the hold of an airplane! Always take your dog or pet on board with you, no matter what. My Tucker was flown to me and was in the hold when he was a puppy. To this day (4 years later), he still looks up at planes when he hears them flying over head. Never again would I traumatize my dogs. My dogs are my family and they get treated with the same respect I do.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on I Tunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

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Enjoying the sumer day.
Enjoying the sumer day.

So You Want To Be In Rescue?

So you want to rescue dogs, huh? The first thing you need to do is ask youself why? If you are looking to help dogs for any other reason, then to make a dogs life better, then please find another hobby. Make no mistakes; dog rescue is ALL about the DOGS! My stock response to anyone who ask’s about why I rescue, is, “it’s all about the dogs”! I look at rescue like this; no matter how inconvenient it is for me to help a dog, when one needs to be helped, what I go through is nothing compared to what is happening to the dog at that moment. One thing is true and constant, you will be called upon to rescue a dog in need, at the most inconvenient time you can think of! So, what do you do? You go get that dog, that’s what you do! Why? Because that dog needs you! Even if you do not have the time, the room, the money or the ability, you go help the dog! Your in rescue NOW! And it is not about you anymore, It’s all about the dog! So get out there and help that dog (but, please read this first, so you know how).

The very first thing you need to realize, is that these dogs are scared, confused and depressed. Their entire world as they know it has turned upside down! I can not stress this enough. These dogs are under a lot of stress. You are not going to see the dogs true personality. They just lost their home, their family, they may be neglected and abused, hungry, or hurt. They are in a strange place, confinded and they are scared and stressed. These dogs need understanding and gentle handling. You must however, protect yourself at all times! The dog has enough issues at this point and being labeled a biter is something that the dog does not need and you can prevent it from happening. Remember, you are here to protect that dog, not cause more harm. Positioning yourself in such a way as to allow the dog to bite you or provoking a bite,  regardless if you meanrt to or not, is unacceptable.

Why do we rescue? Simply put, because the dogs need our help. The big picture is; every year, four million dogs are murdered, because they do not have a home. No other reason, but they are homeless. Now, having said that, millions of other dogs are purposely murdered each year in labs across the US. Here dogs are tortured, starved, experimented upon and out right killed in the name of product testing and medical research. Sadly, it is very hard to help those dogs as the labs keep tight reign on themselves and do not allow information about what they do to become public.

So, with four million dogs murdered each year why even try to save any? It’s obvious that no matter how hard we try, we won’t even make a dent in the numbers. That is absolutely correct! We won’t, but here is a story that accurately explains why we become so dedicated to rescuing dogs.

It was a beautiful summer day, the sky was an amazing shade of bright blue. Big puffy cotton white clouds floated by over head. This was the stuff of our childhood dreams, the beach was a brilliant shade of white. The water dazzling shade of turquoise, gently lapping the white sandy beach. Littering the beach were tiny star fish. You could barely walk on the beach without stepping on the star  fish. Walking along the beach was a man. While he was walking he was picking up star fish, as many as he could hold and was gently tossing them back into the ocean. Further down the beach was another man standing watching the first man tossing the star fish. As the man tossing the star fish approached, the other man said; “aren’t you wasting your time? With all the thousands of star fish laying on this beach, what difference is it going to make, by throwing back a few hundred star fish into the ocean?” the Man looked down and picked up a star fish. He held it and looked at it, then he looked at the other and said “it makes all the difference in the world for this star fish”, and he proceeded to toss it into the ocean. Then he continued walking along the beach tossing more star fish into the ocean.

That story sums up why we are in rescue, to make a world of difference to the dogs we can save, to mourn the loss of those we can not and to work hard to prevent the same from happening in the future. As rescuer’s we shed a lot of tears for those we can not save and it is a constant reminder that we need to work harder to prevent more dogs from being unwanted in the future. Be fore warned your soul will be torn to shreds working in rescue, you will shed a lot of tears and people will think you are crazy, but there is nothing like the feeling you get when you find that perfect home for a deserving dog. You will find that dogs appreciate everything you do for them and they will show it.

The best way to get into dog rescue is to ease yourself into it a little at a time. This allows you to get an understanding of what it is like and what is required. Most of all, it allows you to test the waters and see if you like rescuing dogs, after all this is not for everyone.

My suggestion is to start with transporting dogs, this is a very important job and there are never enough quality people available. While this sounds like an easy boring job, it isn’t by any means. The first thing you need to do, is ‘Google or Yahoo” your favorite breed and the word “rescue” and your state. Example: “Dachshund rescue NJ”. Then you contact the rescue and explain that you want to help transport dogs. If you already have friends rescuing, it should be easier getting started. You will probably be put on a contact list and then you wait. It’s funny, the way rescue transports work is like everyone is a super hero. Everyone goes about their business, and daily life, you have no idea who they are…until! The email or phone call and then everyone goes into rescue mode and the super heroes show up. You will get an email saying on a certain date, a dog from Georgia is going to a forever home in Maine. The travel route will be laid out by the travel coordinator.

The coordinator is the boss of the transport, they are the one’s responsible for that dog getting to it’s destination! The travel route will be broken down in to approximately 1 hour driving blocks with 15 minutes to transfer the dog and to make sure the dog has water and a potty break. Essentially this is a relay race across the county with a dog instead of a baton and there is NO dropping the “baton”.

You sign up for the date and time that you can drive. Then you go to the prearranged meeting area and you wait for the dog to come to you. You secure the paperwork and the dogs belongings and then you secure the dog, you water him and let him go potty, then it’s off to the next meeting point. You give the paperwork over to your relief, you give the dogs belongings over and then you hand the dog over, so they can water and let him go potty. When you receive the dog, you call the transport coordinator and when you transfer the dog, you call the transport coordinator. When you call the transport coordinator, you give a quick report of the status of the dog and if there were any problems. Then you go back home and get reabsorbed into your daily life until the next time.

You must remember that these dogs are stressed, confused and scared. You need to be prepared and treat the dogs as gentle as possible. DO NOT bring your dogs on a transport! DO NOT bring your dogs on a transport! Here is what not to do! I was on a mixed breed transport. We were moving 3 pit bulls from a high kill shelter down south to a foster home up north. The dogs were in the middle of their second day of transport. I had myself and a helper (always try to have two people in a vehicle). We arrived and met the driver of the next leg. She was a tiny older lady that stood 5 foot tall in a subcompact car. There is nothing wrong with being a petite woman in rescue, most of the rescuer’s are women and they do an excellent job. This lady was doing the transport for the first time, no helper, tiny car, 3 mid sized dogs and the ultimate no no! She decided it was a great idea to bring along her 3 unsocialized chihuahua’s! “Are you kidding me?” So we meet, I give her the paperwork, the dogs belonging (which weren’t much, coming from a shelter). The lady then proceeds to tell me she is afraid of pit bulls and if she had known these were pit bulls, she would not have agreed to transport. The transport schedule had descriptions of the dogs and pictures, this way people can make a conscious decision on weather they can do the transport. When you are on location, it is to late to decide you can’t continue the transport. The lady had to take the dogs, because I could not drive a second leg. She packed up the dog’s stuff and then she put the 3 pits into her car and had her 3 chihuahua’s yapping. I called the coordinator and reported what had happened.

The next segment of this blog will contain the things you need to carry with you when you transport dogs.

Daisy

 

Puppy Stop puppy store shut down!

From NJ.com Washington Township.

 

A Washington Township pet store’s doors will be closed for the next month after it was found to be in violation of health and safety regulations.

The Washington Township council passed a resolution to suspend The Puppy Stop’s license for 30 days, beginning on April 1, and charge a $500 fine after an investigation by the Gloucester County Department of Health alleged violations regarding the Fries Mill Road store’s keeping of medical records and sanitary conditions.

According to a case synopsis of the department of health v. The Puppy Stop, Inc., the pet store was issued a noncompliance rating after county and state animal facility inspectors found violations in May and June of last year.

The “charging documents” issued to the store owner, Mark Harnish, alleged problems with sanitary operations, as well as problems with “patterns and practices” in suggesting the suspension of his operation license.

The synopsis said inspectors could not “effectively correlate” the animals’ medical histories because of issues with intake records. The county reported it did not find any specific harm to animals.

In addition to ceasing operation for 30 days, the owner is to implement a “record keeping system that will ensure that inspections can be done such that each animal’s medical history can be easily tracked and verified,” as well as “pay strict attention to labeling and expiration of medication.”

The synopsis also said Harnish “presented as someone who has a genuine concern for those animals in his care.”

Since 2010, the county’s Department of Consumer Protection has received five complaints regarding The Puppy Stop.

A man who identified himself as the owner, but did not give his full name, said he had “no comment” on the closing when contacted by phone last week.

A notice on the pet store’s Facebook page said the store would be temporarily closing for renovations, including upgrades to the floors, pens, walls and more. It announced on the page on March 26 that “ALL PUPS NEED TO FIND HOMES THIS WEEK.”


Contact staff writer Michelle Caffrey at 856-686-3686 or mcaffrey@southjerseymedia.com