More Home Made Treats

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about making healthy all natural treats.

With all the problems that are going on with treats and dog food made in China, it’s time to start making our own dog treats. I know what goes in them and how they were made. Today, we are going to make sweet potato treats and pumpkin treats. There are two kinds of sweet potato treats, chewy and crunchy. We will start with the pumpkin treats.

What you will need: a dehydrator, I like the Nesco American Harvest FD-61 Snackmaster Encore Dehydrator and Jerky Maker,

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it is a really nice machine that has a fan to circulate the hot air and speed drying time, and adjustable temperature too. A box of 5 pounds of sweet potato’s and a pumpkin or two. A deep baking pan and a large pot to boil water. A sharp knife or two and a mandolin slicer if you want and an ice cream scoop for the pumpkin.

This is really easy. You find a fresh pumpkin at the store and bring it home. Cut it in half. Clean out the seeds, then cut it into strips of a few inches wide. Prepare a deep baking pan by filling it with 2 inches of water. Now pre-heat the oven to 375. Put the slices into the pan and place the pan in the oven for about 15 to 20 minutes. This will soften the pumpkin and allow the soft flesh to be removed from the outer rind. After 20 minutes, test the pumpkin to see if the flesh is soft. Remove the pumpkin slices and place on a plate to cool. I use an ice cream scoop to separate the soft flesh from the rind. I pile the pumpkin in a bowl or on another plate. I take the pumpkin and I put it in my hand and I roll out the pumpkin like a “hot dog” and place it on the dehydrator tray. You could make “cookies” as well. What ever shape you would like.

IMG_7809The orange mis-shaped things are the pumpkin treats. I’m sorry that I don’t have photo’s of the pumpkin preparation, I prepared the pumpkin a few weeks prior to writing this.

Next are the sweet potato treats. Around Thanksgiving, most food stores sell the potato’s in 5 pound boxes really cheap.

IMG_7754Now,get a big pot and boil some water. Put about 3/4 of the pot full of water. Now take the sweet potato and get a sharp knife. Slice the potato like a salami, I like 3/16 to a 1/4 inch thick slices. Remember, these will shrink, so don’t worry about the thickness. I also take a few potato’s and slice them longways, like a filet. Again, make them about 1/4 thick. If you have a mechanical slicer like a mandolin slicer, you can use that too. I find they tend to slice too thin and make sweet potato chips.

IMG_7761IMG_7767

IMG_7779Now if you want to make chewy treats, dump some of the potato slices in the boiling water and let them stay for about 10 minutes or so. This is not a precise operation, so the time is not to critical.

IMG_7803You will see the potato become a brighter orange.

IMG_7806The top slice is raw and the bottom slice is boiled. As you remove the boiled slices from the water, put them directly on to the dehydrator trays.

IMG_7807IMG_7805The nice thing with this dehydrator is that you have to have a minimum of 4 trays in place to operate, but you can add trays up to 12. You don’t want the slices to over lap. When all the trays are filled, it’s time to set the temperature.

IMG_7810We will use the fruits and vegetables setting at 135 degrees.

IMG_7811We put the top on and plug it in and you can hear the fan start blowing and now we wait for 9 hours or so. Again, this is not an exact operation, so if you want them drier, keep it on longer.

After 9 hours, I lift the top and see how things are coming along. This batch of treats came out great. Now I have all the dogs at my feet patiently waiting for me to drop one or two. This is the first time that I made the pumpkin treats. Luckily, I have some more pumpkin frozen, so I can make more. My dogs really love the pumpkin treats.

I was able to make 4 sandwich baggies and two quart baggies worth of treats. Let us know how you made out with your treat making.

On a side note, you need a sharp knife. I have been using this knife sharpener for years, it works great and I highly recommend it. The Edge Maker Knife Sharpener

IMG_7785IMG_7787You just put the sharpener on the edge of the counter and then you just run the blade through the metal prongs, like your trying to slice through it.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on  ITunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

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Fly The Friendly Skies… And Die?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Flying with your dog.

Every year many people travel and they want to bring their dog. Many people opt to have their dog go in the cargo hold. Supposedly, the airlines will take great care of the dog, kept inside until the last minute and then last to load and first to unload and back into a climate controlled are. Sadly, many pets die each year while traveling. Many dogs die during the transport in the hold. This story is a little different. This dog died because of poor treatment and neglect prior to loading. If this was my dog and I saw what was happening, I would have been very vocal and demand something be done immediately. Here is the story.

By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO (Reuters) – Michael Jarboe of Miami paid extra for special airline dog handlers to ensure the safety of his 2-year-old mastiff, BamBam, on a cross-country flight.

Instead, following a layover in Houston in 90-degree heat, baggage handlers found BamBam dead on arrival in San Francisco.

Just in time for the holiday travel season, a Change.org petition is calling for new federal rules holding airlines responsible for deaths of animals like BamBam. More than 100,000 signatures were logged on Jarboe’s petition as of late Tuesday, more than half of them added in the past two weeks.

Jarboe said one of his goals is to make pet owners aware about the danger of airline travel.

BamBam, who died in 2012, is hardly alone.

Pets flying with their owners are killed, injured or lost on average once every 10 days, according to Mary Beth Melchior, founder of the watchdog group Where Is Jack Inc. who keeps a tally of large carriers’ reports to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Her organization is named for a 5-year-old cat who died in 2011 after being lost for two months in New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

“You run the same risk of losing your pet as you do your luggage,” said Jarboe. “It’s Russian roulette.”

The Humane Society of the United States suggests driving with your pet or leaving your animal at home with a pet sitter before choosing airline travel.

“Air travel can be so quick that you may think a plane is the best way to transport your pet. Think again. Air travel isn’t safe for pets. The HSUS recommends that you do not transport your pet by air unless absolutely necessary,” the organization’s website cautions.

The tragedy of BamBam gained steam at Change.org after the petition was linked to Janet Sinclair’s Facebook page titled “United Airlines Almost Killed My Greyhound” dedicated to her dog Sedona’s flight experience in July.

Sinclair and Jarboe said they both chose to fly with their dogs on United because of its highly regarded Pet Safe program, which was started at Continental Airlines before the carriers’ merger.

Both said the program promised their dogs would be held before and after flights and during layovers in an air-conditioned cargo facility, and transported to and from the planes in an air-conditioned van.

They say the system broke down during layovers in Houston where they say the dogs were left on the tarmac and in non air-conditioned cargo spaces in the summer heat for hours between flights.

“Our goal is the safe and comfortable travel of all the pets that fly with us,” United’s Megan McCarthy said on Tuesday in an emailed response to Reuters concerning the cases.

“On the rare occasion we don’t deliver on that goal, we work with our customers, their vets and our team of vets to resolve the issue,” she added.

Jarboe said he and his partner could see BamBam from their seats on the plane arriving for the second leg of the flight on a luggage cart with baggage handlers, instead of the promised air-conditioned van and special dog handlers.

“We could see right in the kennel. He was standing there swaying there back and forth with his tongue hanging out farther than I’ve ever seen it, drooling,” Jarboe said.

Sinclair said she watched as baggage handlers in Houston “kick Sedona’s crate, kick, kick, kick it six times to get it under the wing and left it there to boil on the tarmac.”

Jarboe said United reported that its autopsy of BamBam was inconclusive after the death, but that his own vet was convinced the dog died of heatstroke. Jarboe said United eventually paid him about $3,770, the price of a new dog and crate.

Sinclair said United agreed to pay Sedona’s hospital bill of about $2,700 for treatment of what the vet diagnosed as heat-stroke and dehydration. But Sinclair said she declined the offer because of an airline condition that she sign a confidentiality agreement.

For holiday travelers thinking about flying with a pet, Jarboe, Sinclair and Melchior offer the same advice: Don’t.

(Editing by David Adams and Doina Chiacu)

The moral of this story is, NEVER put your pet in the hold of an airplane! Always take your dog or pet on board with you, no matter what. My Tucker was flown to me and was in the hold when he was a puppy. To this day (4 years later), he still looks up at planes when he hears them flying over head. Never again would I traumatize my dogs. My dogs are my family and they get treated with the same respect I do.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on I Tunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

emails us @ daisysrescue@comcast.net

Enjoying the sumer day.
Enjoying the sumer day.

Follow Archie as he endures the rough treatment for Heart Worms!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Heart worms. How to prevent it, how to treat it, why it is important to give your dog the monthly preventative.

Archie 2013-11

Meet Archie, he is a very sweet boy. Archie has a stage 3 heart worm infestation. Therefore, Archie is very sick despite his healthy look. Archie becomes short of breath when he plays with toys. See, Archie has worms in his heart. Well, in the artery that is between his heart and his lungs. Archie is going to have to endure very painful and poisonous treatment to kill the heart worms. If Archie survives the medication, he will have to endure the worms dying inside his body and then his body will have to absorb the dead decaying worms. Sadly, all this could have been prevented with monthly heart worm preventative medication.

This article is going to be in every day language and not in medical terminology, this is so everyone can understand how serious this condition is. I will have links to medical web sites that can explain the heart worm infection in medical detail.

Heart worms are just that, small thin long worms that live inside the arteries and heart of a dog. The worms produce more worms until the worms totally clog the arteries and damage the heart beyond repair.  The whole sad cycle starts like this. A mosquito bites and infected dog and ingests worm larva with the blood. When the mosquito bites another dog, the worm larva is deposited into the dog. Over a period of a few months, the larva slowly make their way through the dog and ends up in the dogs pulmonary artery (the artery that comes from the right side of the heart and goes to the lungs). The worms mostly live in the pulmonary artery. When the infestation is really bad, the worms can back up into the heart. There are both male and female worms. The male worms are smaller and easier to kill, the females are larger. The worms can live up to 7 years.

Now, we need to get rid of these worms. The only approved method that exists is an arsenic type of drug (immiticide), that is injected into the dog. Since arsenic is poisonous to both the dog and the worms, it is not going to be an easy road. The arsenic slowly kills the worms by starving them. It takes the worms about 10 days to die and not all the worms will die. Usually the smaller male worms die first. The usual treatment for killing heart worms is two injections of immiticide one day apart. The immiticide is the arsenic based medication. Since the body does not like it, the muscle where the injection is, becomes very sore and may swell. As with any meds, the dog may have a reaction to the medication itself. The medication attacks the worms and they start to die. When the worms start to die, the body can have a reaction to the dead worms. It has been found that the heart worms have a bacteria inside them, when the worms die, the bacteria will leak out of the worm and cause a severe reaction in the dog. So to minimize this reaction, an antibiotic is given to the dog a few weeks before the heart worm treatment begins. The antibiotic doxycycline, kills the bacteria in the worm, which also seems to weaken the worm and makes it more susceptible to the arsenic. With the bacteria gone, when the worms die they don’t leak the bacteria and the dog has less of a reaction to the dying worms. Even if the dog does not have a reaction to the meds, and the dead worms, there still is a huge risk! The worms that are dead and dying are still inside the dog and they have nowhere to go. The worms rot inside the dog. The dog’s body absorbs the dead worms. It is very important to keep the dog calm and as confined as possible. If the worms break apart they will float into the lungs and block blood vessels. These are called pulmonary embolisms. The vessels that are clogged prevent blood from going into the lungs and exchange oxygen. This is why the dog may become short of breath. The bigger the clot the greater the danger and the worse the breathing will be. This can also cause chest pain. This is why you need to really watch your dog. If he becomes short of breath, you need to check his gums to see if they are pink. If they are  pale, or blue, the dog needs to get to the vets immediately.

For small infestations, the preferred treatment is two shots 24 hours a part. The two shots will cause about 60 to 80% KILL. For bad infestations, one injection with crate rest for one month, then two shots 24 hours apart will cause up to a 98% kill rate. Oddly enough, a 100% kill rate is not the goal. The goal is to remove enough worms quickly to reduce the chance of damage to the heart and arteries. With regular monthly heart worm preventatives (to prevent new worms), the remaining adult heart worms will die eventually and then the dog will be worm free.

Crate rest is a must because any movement of the dog could cause the worms to break off and float into the lungs. The dog is to be carried outside, put down to do business and then picked up and carried back to the crate. So for bad infestations like Archie’s, crate rest is required for at least 2 months. Some people do not like to crate rest their dogs. They feel it is cruel or that they are neglecting or withholding love from the dog. The reality is, it is with great love that we crate rest these dogs, so they can have every change to survive and have a great life after the heart worm. We can’t wait to see Archie running and chasing squirrels in the back yard!

Sadly, all of this can be 100% PREVENTABLE! Just one little pill a month is all that is required to prevent all this pain and suffering.

Hear Gard Plus Heart Worm PreventativeIMG_4994

This is the Heart Gard Plus heart worm preventative. It is meat flavored to taste like a treat. Most dogs readily take the Heart Gard Plus. The preventative is weight based and every veterinary hospital and office sells heart worm preventative. There is no excuse for any dog to become heart worm positive. There are other heart worm preventatives as well, Trifexis, Sentinel, Interceptor, Iverhart, Revolution. All are easily obtained. If you feel that your veterinarian’s price is too high, you can go online with a prescription and you may be able to buy them cheaper. There is no excuse!

Archie is resting in his crate.

Archie crate rest 2013-11-14

Archie was found as a stray on the side of a country road in South Carolina. He was taken in by a good samaritan, Archie was very thin and it was apparent that Archie was out on his own for quite some time. The Dog Rescue, New Life Animal Rescue, stepped up to save him. Archie was transported up to New Jersey, where he is receiving his treatment. Archie was taken to the University of Pennsylvania Small Animal Hospital, where he was seen by veterinarian cardiologists. Archie had a ultrasound of his heart and found to have a large infestation of worms in the pulmonary artery and luckily the worms were not in his heart yet. He was put on the doxycycline for a few weeks and has just started his Immiticide shots (11-12-2013). We now have to wait one month, then he will get his two shot 24 hours apart. So far Archie is doing well. He is 4 days (11-16-2013), after his shot. He was sore the next day and he was acting like he was not feeling well, quiet and sleeping a lot. We pick him up and take him outside to go potty. He is allowed to walk on a leash in a very small area, then he is picked up again and taken back inside and he goes into his crate. Archie has two crates. We keep him in the living room with us in a bigger crate, then he goes into the bedroom with us and he has a smaller crate. We cover him up and he goes to sleep. Archie gets fed in his crate and he has his water in the crate. We do allow him to come out of the crate and allow him to sit in our laps or next to us on the couch. If he gets too excited, he goes back into the crate.

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Archie being examined at the U of Penn.

We will up date this article regularly. So come back often to see him get well. Archie’s medical bills are very expensive. If you would like to help with Archie’s medical bills, you can donate money through New Life Animal Rescue donation link. All donations will go !00% to the New Life Animal Rescue.

Links to learn more about Heart Worm prevention and treatment. www.2ndchance.inf and www.heartwormsociety.org.

Thank you for visiting Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource Page For Dog Rescue And Care. Follow us by subscribing to our web site by email, and [lease visit us on www.facebook.com/daisysrescue, www.twitter.com/daisysrescue . Email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net . Look for our podcasts on iTunes.

2013-11-23,  Archie is 11 days after his injection. This is an important time for him. This is the period where the largest amount of worms will be dying off. The medicine starves the worms and they start to die after 10 days. So, we are keeping a close eye on Archie. He has had a few episodes of breathing hard and some pain. We are assuming that the pain is the worms dying off and moving into his lungs causing small clots called embolisms. While the small clots are bad and cause mild shortness of breath, they are survivable. We are watching Archie for signs of large clots which can cause death. This is why we are so careful not to let Archie move around too much. If a group of dead worms move into the lungs and cause a major obstruction, not only will it cause severe pain, but a large amount of blood will be blocked from entering the lungs and exchanging oxygen. This effect the entire body and is not good. So far Archie is doing great. We will keep you up dated every couple of days.

2013-12-11 Archie Update.

Archie was feeling much better on the December 9, he was feeling the best since he has been with us. It was hard to keep him in the crate. He has a lot of energy. Even with some extended couch time and extra bones, he is full of energy. He seemed to enjoy the snow. He is still on limited exercise.

1468643_10200642600700011_1512506564_nDecember 10, Archie was taken back to the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, for his second and third shot of immiticide.

5fffc9f4-794e-47d4-9aaf-6824a4927ee2_profileArchie waiting in the waiting room for Dr. Dennis, his cardiologist.

Since Archie did so great, he did not have to stay over an extra night. He had a painful ride home, it was very evident he felt the road bumps. Once home he was allowed to rest and get comfortable on the big bed with his foster Dad. Archie took a few hours to relax and then finally settle down for a nice nap.

1472881_443782532389516_174678006_nArchie ended up relaxed enough, that he rolled over and laid on his back. Archie is now resting comfortably in his night time sleeping crate. Thanks to everyone wishing him well.

2013-12-14, Archie is doing great. He seems to have done better with the two shots this time than the one shot last time. He has been quiet the last few days. His pain level seems to be minimal. We are keeping him on pain meds, just to make sure. Archie seems to be a lot more active and sadly, it looks like it will be harder for him to stay in the crate. We give him bones and we do allow some couch time with him being very quiet and not allowed to move. I can’t wait for January, so Archie will be done crate rest. I can tell already, he is going to be a terror, I can’t wait!.

2014-01-22, Archie is now off crate rest and has been to the vet’s and is heart worm free!!!!!!!!! He has also been fixed. He is doing well, enjoying his freedom. He has boundless energy and is very happy to run around the house. Thank you to everyone who prayed and sent good thoughts to him.

February 7, 2014,

Archie is doing very well. He is now totally off crate rest (he has for a few weeks now). He likes the other dogs in the house, although he gets into their personal space too often. Archie has one speed… Mach 8! He runs through the house and has the amazing ability to be able to lower his head and grab toys on the fly without slowing down or missing a step.  We affectionately call him the “Red Terror”, he has to remove every toy from the toy bin and leave them all over the house. If we do not watch Archie like a hawk, we find bits of white fluffy stuffing on the floor from another toy that Archie has killed. The pile of toys needing repair is growing. Archie is non stop, he runs around the house and jumps up onto the couch, then down, runs around the couch to the hall and back again. Archie is a puppy at heart. We love him to death!

Archie enjoying the fireHere Archie is taking a rare break to enjoy the warmth of the fire before taking off through the house again. As you can see, Archie has to remove all the toys from the bin.

Archie surveying the damageArchie is living life! And he should! He is a sweet dog that certainly deserves the perfect home. Luckily for Archie we have a few homes lined up. Archie certainly has a Doxie personality. His big nose, floppy ears and huge front paws are shadowed by his tremendous personality. He certainly is a sweet, sweet boy!

In the world of dog rescue, Archie is the kind of story we all like; he came to us very sick, he was treated by some great Doctor’s, he was nursed back to health and made a great recovery and is now ready for his very own forever home. Archie is now living life to it’s fullest! We will continue to post his progress here. I just want to thank everyone again; from   New Life Rescue (who made the commitment to help him), to the Doctor’s and staff at University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, for his great care, to the Doctor’s and staff at Voorhees Veterinarian Hospital (for his post Heart Worm follow up care), and to everyone who has kept Archie in your thoughts and prayers, we could not have been able to help this precious guy. Some times it takes a village to save a life. Of course to those special people who have opened there hearts and homes, by offering a forever home to Archie. We are very honored to have been able to help Archie, he is very special. Thank you all.

February 23, 2014,

Archie had his new buddy Blue over today for a play date. Blue’s Mom is going to be adopting Archie and they are getting along great! We could not have hoped for a better match. With all the dogs here, Archie naturally migrates over to Blue when they all are outside in the yard. Blue seems to like the companionship of Archie next to him. When Blue is in his Mom’s lap, he doesn’t seem to mind Archie climbing up and sitting next him in Mom’s lap either. This looks like it is going to be a great and lasting relationship.

March 4, 2014,  Archie went to his new forever home today! Archie has an awesome new Mom and an awesome new brother Blue! Lets wish Archie a great new life! He is a very deserving dog. Best wishes to Archie and his new family!

IMG_5372 IMG_5373Thank you everyone for your kind thoughts and prayers! This could not have happened with each and everyone of you!

 

 

Obesity… It’s Not Just for Humans Any More.

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Senior Dogs and obesity, by Cathie Garnier, the founder and President of Elder Paws Senior Dog Rescue.

Food…while necessary to sustain life it can also be a catalyst to   obesity and diminished life span.  Canine obesity is one of the fastest growing health problems for senior dogs today.  In a nation of nearly 170 million pets up to 50% of pets in the US are overweight or even obese.  That equates to a whopping 85 million pets carrying too much weight on their bodies.

As with humans obesity in our four legged companions has been associated with a host of chronic health conditions, including, but not limited to, diabetes, heart and lung disease, and even cancer, all of which negatively impact a pet’s quality of life and longevity and cause a dramatic increase in the cost of vet care.  For example the average cost to treat a diabetic dog in 2011 was over $900 (according to Pet Plan USA, a pet insurance company).  All too often owners are not able to afford the high cost of such treatment resulting in senior dogs being surrendered to kill shelters, where they are likely to never make it out alive.

Excess weight causes increased stress on a dog’s heart and lungs, which have to work harder, leading to breathing problems.  This results in a higher risk of complications under anesthesia for such procedures as regular dental cleanings or life saving surgeries.  For those living in warmer climates the extra weight, combined with a dogs coat, can make obese dogs miserable in hot weather and make it harder for them to cool down.

The most common health condition by far that we, as a senior dog rescue, see in seniors is Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD), also known as osteoarthritis.   Excess weight puts added strain on the joints, resulting in a higher level of joint damage leading to more significant DJD.  Eventually joints begin to prematurely wear under the strain of excess weight leading to intense pain that limits mobility and decreases quality of life.  Dogs with longer backs and shorter legs, i.e., Doxies and Corgis, are at a greater risk of suffering from DJD.

Vet care to treat DJD and ligament tears costs an average of $2,000  (according to Pet Plan USA).  Dr. Jules Benson, V.P. of Vet Services at Pet Plan USA states “It is not uncommon to see dogs that are rendered practically immobile by a combination of weight and joint issues.”  Personally, I find it heartbreaking to watch a senior dog suffer with the increasing pain and lack of mobility caused by a condition that could have been avoided in the first place.

While dogs do not die directly from DJD the intense negative impact to their mobility and quality of life often leads owners to a premature decision to euthanize due to debilitating pain issues coupled with the high cost of continued vet care.

Your dog depends on you to keep them healthy and happy.  Your dog pays a very high cost when you “love your dog with food”.  Leaner, trimmer dogs are at a lower risk of developing DJD, thereby improving quality of life and the number of years your pet has to spend with you, as well as reducing the cost of vet care.  Helping them shed those excess pounds may be the most loving thing an owner can do for their pet.

Cathie Garnier is Founder and President of Elder Paws Senior Dog Rescue, a California non-profit which is committed to reducing the euthanasia rate of dogs 7 and older in high kill shelters based on age and age related health conditions.  As a 501©(3) Elder Paws relies solely on tax deductible donations to cover the higher cost of vet care to treat senior dogs and prepare them for adoption.  www.elderpawsrescue.org and www.petfinder.com.

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