Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow!

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn useful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about what to use to remove unwanted ice and snow this winter.

It’s that time of year again, winter. with winter comes cold weather, snow and ice. When the snow and ice cover walkways and roads, we naturally want to remove it for our safety. The most common way to remove ice after we shovel the snow is to put down rock salt. The problem is, most ice melting products are very poisonous to dogs. But before we get into why they are poisonous, lets talk about how rock salt melts ice.

Water freezes at about 32 degrees. When you put rock salt on the ice, the salt dissolves and forms a brine solution (saltwater). The brine actually lowers the freezing point of water, so the ice melts. How about other types of ice melt, magnesium, calcium, urea and poly glycol? These chemicals lower the freezing point of water and there by melt the ice. Some of the chemicals have an added bonus to melting ice, they create a chemical reaction when mixed with water and they heat up, this is known as exothermic dissolution.

Having discussed how ice melter’s work, lets look at how safe they are. What I found out through searching many websites on the internet is that just about all the ice melter’s are toxic at some level. Some chemicals are safer than others, but all become toxic at some point.  Rock salt is sodium, it irritates the paws and skin of dogs, it dries out skin, and can cause inflammation. When the paws are licked the dog ingests the sodium. Calcium and magnesium are naturally occurring chemicals in the body. They are essential chemicals in the body, but having too much of these chemicals can really harm your pet. Besides the skin and paw irritation, ingesting too much can cause cardiac problems. Propylene glycol has been approved by the FDA as a food additive for human and pet foods in very low doses. Propylene glycol is used to decide planes. Urea is a chemical that is naturally made in the bodies of animals and humans, it is a component of urine. It is often used in topical products for human use, like shampoos and hand creams. It is not meant to be ingested, while it is not terribly poisonous, it’s not something you want to do.

Here are a list of general signs and symptoms of poisoning and toxicity in the above chemicals.

Dermatitis or irritated skin, inflammation of paws, red irritated paws, staggering, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, staggering, fluid retention or swelling of the paws, legs, abdomen because of fluid, overly thirsty, extreme urination, seizures and kidney and liver failure.

If your dog starts with any of the following, please go to your vet right away! These can be life threatening. You never want to mess around with the life of your dog.

Here are some products that claim to be safe for use around pets.

Happy Paws Solid Ice Melt , they claim to be pet safe and use calcium magnesium acetate. They advertise they DO NOT use salt, chlorides, glycols, amides and ureas.

Morton Safe-T-Pet Snow & Ice Melt, uses propylene glycol and urea. They claim the product is safe and was designed with veterinarian over sight and in put.

PSTL PAW THAW ICE MELT, This company does not say what is uses.

Safe Paw Ice Melter , this company uses propylene glycol. They claim this is safe for pets.

Let’s look at some alternative ways to remove snow and ice.

In stead of using chemicals, how about using an ice chipper to remove the ice. Suncast 8-Inch Snow & Ice Scraper with D-Grip Handle. An Ice chipper has a flat metal blade and a long wooden handle like a shovel, you stand over the ice and you slam down the chipper on the ice breaking it.  You can still melt ice and not use chemicals too, you can use Propane Turbo Torch, Propane Torch Weed Burner Motor Heater Ice Snow Melter Pipe Thaw, or Bare Ground Solutions Bare Blaster Snow & Ice Melting Propane Torch. Basically it is a propane torch with a long nozzle so you can reach the ground and apply the flame directly to the ice and snow. The added benefit of this torch is, in the summer you can burn weeds and be totally environmentally friendly by not using any chemicals. You can throw sand down over the ice, while it does not melt it will provide a non slip surface to walk across. You can buy sand at any home improvement store and makes a great alternative to melting ice.  Another alternative non ice melt is kitty liter, the non clumping kitty liter. You can get the cheap store brand non clumping liter at any store. You can also use doggie booties. Pawz Blue Water-Proof Dog Boot , Ultra Paws TrAction Dog Boots . These go over your dogs feet and protects them from the cold and from the chemicals used in ice melts. You dog may walk funny until he gets used to them, but these are a very safe way to protect your dog. Here is an alternative to the slip on booties, Invisible Dog Boots – Protect Paws From Sand  Hot Pavement, Ice, and Salt with All Natural 100% Wax-Based Cream. For Dogs Who Just Won’t Wear Boots.

Just a quick recap. Please do your home work and research products that you may wish to use to remove snow and ice, to make sure they are safe for your dog. If you would rather use no chemical alternatives, all the better. Please remember that this is just an informational guide and that you should make the final decision based on what you feel is safest and best for you dog.

Remember Daisy’s Rescue is here for you, please tell us what you think. Remember you can purchase all you pets needs through other amazon pet supply portal. If you are doing any shopping on Amazon, please use our portal. Remember to visit and like our Facebook page www.facebook.com/daisysrescue email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net Look for us on PATH, TUMBLER and TWITTER, Thank you.

Fly The Friendly Skies… And Die?

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about Flying with your dog.

Every year many people travel and they want to bring their dog. Many people opt to have their dog go in the cargo hold. Supposedly, the airlines will take great care of the dog, kept inside until the last minute and then last to load and first to unload and back into a climate controlled are. Sadly, many pets die each year while traveling. Many dogs die during the transport in the hold. This story is a little different. This dog died because of poor treatment and neglect prior to loading. If this was my dog and I saw what was happening, I would have been very vocal and demand something be done immediately. Here is the story.

By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO (Reuters) – Michael Jarboe of Miami paid extra for special airline dog handlers to ensure the safety of his 2-year-old mastiff, BamBam, on a cross-country flight.

Instead, following a layover in Houston in 90-degree heat, baggage handlers found BamBam dead on arrival in San Francisco.

Just in time for the holiday travel season, a Change.org petition is calling for new federal rules holding airlines responsible for deaths of animals like BamBam. More than 100,000 signatures were logged on Jarboe’s petition as of late Tuesday, more than half of them added in the past two weeks.

Jarboe said one of his goals is to make pet owners aware about the danger of airline travel.

BamBam, who died in 2012, is hardly alone.

Pets flying with their owners are killed, injured or lost on average once every 10 days, according to Mary Beth Melchior, founder of the watchdog group Where Is Jack Inc. who keeps a tally of large carriers’ reports to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Her organization is named for a 5-year-old cat who died in 2011 after being lost for two months in New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

“You run the same risk of losing your pet as you do your luggage,” said Jarboe. “It’s Russian roulette.”

The Humane Society of the United States suggests driving with your pet or leaving your animal at home with a pet sitter before choosing airline travel.

“Air travel can be so quick that you may think a plane is the best way to transport your pet. Think again. Air travel isn’t safe for pets. The HSUS recommends that you do not transport your pet by air unless absolutely necessary,” the organization’s website cautions.

The tragedy of BamBam gained steam at Change.org after the petition was linked to Janet Sinclair’s Facebook page titled “United Airlines Almost Killed My Greyhound” dedicated to her dog Sedona’s flight experience in July.

Sinclair and Jarboe said they both chose to fly with their dogs on United because of its highly regarded Pet Safe program, which was started at Continental Airlines before the carriers’ merger.

Both said the program promised their dogs would be held before and after flights and during layovers in an air-conditioned cargo facility, and transported to and from the planes in an air-conditioned van.

They say the system broke down during layovers in Houston where they say the dogs were left on the tarmac and in non air-conditioned cargo spaces in the summer heat for hours between flights.

“Our goal is the safe and comfortable travel of all the pets that fly with us,” United’s Megan McCarthy said on Tuesday in an emailed response to Reuters concerning the cases.

“On the rare occasion we don’t deliver on that goal, we work with our customers, their vets and our team of vets to resolve the issue,” she added.

Jarboe said he and his partner could see BamBam from their seats on the plane arriving for the second leg of the flight on a luggage cart with baggage handlers, instead of the promised air-conditioned van and special dog handlers.

“We could see right in the kennel. He was standing there swaying there back and forth with his tongue hanging out farther than I’ve ever seen it, drooling,” Jarboe said.

Sinclair said she watched as baggage handlers in Houston “kick Sedona’s crate, kick, kick, kick it six times to get it under the wing and left it there to boil on the tarmac.”

Jarboe said United reported that its autopsy of BamBam was inconclusive after the death, but that his own vet was convinced the dog died of heatstroke. Jarboe said United eventually paid him about $3,770, the price of a new dog and crate.

Sinclair said United agreed to pay Sedona’s hospital bill of about $2,700 for treatment of what the vet diagnosed as heat-stroke and dehydration. But Sinclair said she declined the offer because of an airline condition that she sign a confidentiality agreement.

For holiday travelers thinking about flying with a pet, Jarboe, Sinclair and Melchior offer the same advice: Don’t.

(Editing by David Adams and Doina Chiacu)

The moral of this story is, NEVER put your pet in the hold of an airplane! Always take your dog or pet on board with you, no matter what. My Tucker was flown to me and was in the hold when he was a puppy. To this day (4 years later), he still looks up at planes when he hears them flying over head. Never again would I traumatize my dogs. My dogs are my family and they get treated with the same respect I do.

Thank you for visiting us here at Daisy’s Rescue. Remember you can get all your pet needs by using other pet supply portal. You can now use our Amazon portal to do all your shopping. Look on I Tunes for our Daisy’s Rescue podcast. Visit us on facebbook, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue

emails us @ daisysrescue@comcast.net

Enjoying the sumer day.
Enjoying the sumer day.

Who Are We? Daisy’s Rescue podcast Episode 1

Daisy’s Rescue Podcast Episode 1

“Who Are We?”

Welcome everyone to the very first podcast of Daisy’s Rescue. This podcast marks a mile stone and the step to the next level in Daisy’s Rescue’s evolution. On November 7, 2013, Daisy’s Rescue had another mile stone achievement, 1,000 views on the blog. Before I get into What Daisy’s Rescues is and how it got started, I just wanted to explain to you a summery of what is in this podcast.

This is Charlie Moe the voice of Daisy’s Rescue, I will tell you who I am, who Daisy is and how Daisy’s Rescue came to be. What Daisy’s Rescue means to me and why I’m hosting podcasts. I’ll talk about what the benefits to me are and more importantly, what the benefits to you are. Why you should keep listen and what you will get out of listening.

Prior to creating Daisy’s Rescue blog and now podcasts, I read and listened to people who are already doing blogs and podcasts and one thing that was very important to me was transparency and honesty. I want everyone to know why things are being done and to be able to help you. I want this podcast to be of help to you and not to waste your time. The pod casts are going to be long enough to cover the topic, but not so long as to bore you. The podcasts will be a combination of just me talking and or guest interviews. Since these are for you, please leave comments, tell us your experiences and what you would like to hear in the future. Thank you for listening to Daisy’s Rescue, A resource page for Dog Rescue and care.

I’m Charlie Moe, I’m the main person behind Daisy’s Rescue. A quick bio on me. I have a Ba in History, I like medieval European history and architecture. I work as a Paramedic and have been doing so for a number of years. I have a lot of intercity in the trenches 911 experience.

I’m very passionate about dog rescue and animal rights. It all started few years ago, when we wanted to get a playmate for our puppy Tucker, a mini longhaired Dachshund. We applied to the Dachshund Rescue of North America, we looked at a few dogs and when we had our home visit, the lady doing the visit said that we would be the perfect family for a special dog in Illinois. She wasn’t necessarily the best dog for us, as a playmate for Tucker, but we were perfect for her. We agreed and Daisy was adopted by us. We drove 10 hours west to meet another member of the Dachshund Rescue of North America, whom had just drove 5 hours to get Daisy for us.

Daisy is a beautiful Black and Tan Piebald long haired Dachshund. Her picture is the one on the blog site, the black and white Dachshund. Pie bald means that while she is a black and tan, she is missing the gene that gives her the tan pigment in her fur, so where ever the tan should be she is white. But in reality the white really isn’t white either, it is a lack of pigment and a total lack of color is white. Now, Daisy spent 4 years in a puppy mill, pumping out puppies. When the puppy miller was done with her he took her to a high kill shelter to be killed. A lady there at the shelter called the DRNA and she was pulled and fostered. When Daisy’s foster Mom first saw her, she felt that Daisy was so abused that they may not be able to help her, but she would try anyway. Daisy probably had over 8 litters in her four short years in the mill, stuck in a cage, starving, cold, no contact, abused and neglected. Having her babies ripped away from her at too young an age. The realities of puppy mills hit home with us.

When we adopted Daisy, it was 3 months after she was rescued. She had come along way in those three months, but she still had a long way to go. When we first brought her home, we needed to keep a leash on her, because she would not come to us, but after a couple of day I, took the leash and harness off her. My feeling was, this was her forever home and she would not be harnessed in her own home. Slowly Daisy realized that she was home and that no one would ever hurt her again. She would slowly come to us and then stiffen up when we touched her. She no doubt was waiting for a beating or to be abused in some way, having flash backs. Slowly we worked with her, always respecting her space, but also showing her that we were not going to harm her. One of the biggest accomplishments Daisy made was to allow me to brush her when she was eating. Daisy loves to be brushed. Even though Daisy was well loved and taken care of by her foster, she still had a lot of healing to do, both physically and psychologically. Her belly was bald when we first got her, probably due to having puppies and being malnourished. We bought her the best dog food money could by, after all Daisy is worth it. Soon her belly fur started to grow again. Daisy had a hard time going outside when we first adopted her, now she loves to go out in our huge yard and just walk around in the grass sniffing all the smells. She wanders around the yard with her nose to the ground, following the scents. Then when the urge strikes her, she we just start to run through the grass. She loves to lay in the warm sun in the summer and relax, just sun bathing. It took her at least a year before she would start to play with toys, watching Tucker as a model. Then all of a sudden Daisy started to play with toys. Daisy makes big strides in her evolution and then she maintains for while, then she will make another huge stride forward. Playing with toys was one of Daisy bigger accomplishments. Today, Daisy is one of the biggest toy hoarders. She just adores fluffy squeaky toys. The squeaker the better. She loves to kill the squeakers. I have a bag of spare squeakers, that I routinely replace. It’s been 3 years now and Daisy has made the transition into becoming the beautiful dog she was always meant to be. She was saved from the brink of death  by the DRNA and has become a very loved and cherished member of our family. Daisy is now the Alpha female of the pack. She is very quiet and you would never know it looking at her, but no one messes with Daisy. Daisy gets what she wants with the other dogs. Daisy has travelled a long and hard road and while she has made amazing strides, she still has a long way to go.

Daisy is the reason we got into rescue. Daisy has made me passionate about dog rescue and animal advocacy. After we adopted Daisy and saw how many people had volunteered and worked hard to help Daisy and get Daisy to us, we wanted to give back and to pay it forward as a token of our gratitude for the opportunity to adopt and welcome Daisy into our home, family and hearts. We started in rescue slowly. First by transporting other Dachshunds to their forever homes for the DRNA, and then we started expanding to help other rescues transport there dogs as well. During this time, we learned more about rescues and more about puppy mills. We learned from other rescuers and we networked with other rescues. When we felt we were ready, we moved into fostering Dachshunds for the DRNA. When we started fostering, I wanted to use my medic skills with the dogs and we wanted to eventually move to fostering sick and injured dogs. We developed a great relationship with our veterinarian and now we work great together. I do most of the nursing and follow up care on my foster dogs, under my veterinarian’s guidance. Duchess was my second foster Dachshund. She was a sweet old lady who’s family died on her twice. She was a beautiful Black and Tan soft wire hair, that means she is a long hair, but her fur is wavy. We ended up adopt this sweet old lady. Duchess was our failed foster. We felt that with all Duchess had been through, she was home with us and Duchess was worth every second of it. Sadly Duchess had passed on July 5, 2013, we think she was 15 or so. She had, had mammary tumor’s, three of which were removed, horrible dental problems, she had 9 teeth removed, she developed a fistula that went from her mouth into her sinus cavity and had to have that fixed as well. Then Duchess developed Chushing’s disease and had a slight back injury with severe arthritis. She lived with us for a little over 2 years. We miss her dearly. She was an integral part of the pack, involved in every aspect of our daily activities. Duchess showed us determination and how to have a zest for life no matter what. Duchess taught us a lot about life and that Senior Dogs are truly deserving of a great life. It is Duchess that has made me committed to helping Seniors, injured and sick dogs. Duchess has left a mark in our hearts and an emptiness in our souls and our pack.

During our transports and fostering, while we had a member over see us, we still made a lot of mistakes and learned a lot of things the hard way. We also learned a lot from other rescuers. From fostering dogs, we then decided to make another step into rescue and become members of the Dachshund Rescue of North America. With membership in the DRNA, came an orientation class and a mentor. Of course even with a mentor we still had a lot to learn. We continue to make mistakes, but we are willing to learn from other rescuers and that’s how the concept of Daisy’s Rescues, A Resource Page for Dog Rescue and Care came to be. I wanted a central location where rescuer’s could come and share tricks of the trade and their experiences with other rescuer’s, so others didn’t have to learn things the hard way and make mistakes. I also wanted ordinary people to come to the site and get tips on how to take care of their dogs. When I do home visits for rescues, I like to talk to the future adopter about basic dog care and the responsibilities of a Guardian. I talk about the commitment that must be understood and made before adopting a dog. On many occasions I have had future adopters tell me, that I really explained things in details and made it easy for them to understand and that I emphasized certain aspects of care that was very important, but many veterinarians just glossed over. They told me that I should start a dog care website to help people understand how to better take care of their dogs.

Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource Page For Dog Rescue And Care, takes on both those challenges, a resource page for both rescuers and guardians. I like the word guardian better than owner, as owner to me, down grades the positions of dogs into a possession and not a living breathing being. My goal is that rescues will encourage their foster families and new adopters to use the site as a resource. Daisy’s Rescue is a place for rescuers to network and share experiences, tips and information. Daisy’s Rescue is a place where Guardian’s can come and learn how to take care of their dog, network with other Guardian’s and share ideas.

When the blogs are written, I and or my guests may list products, these products are there so if you like the article and want to purchase or research that product, there is a direct link to that product to make it easier for you to find it. If you decide to buy that product, we will get a small percentage of the sale price for “advertising”, that money is used to fund the site and the podcasts. In the future, when our following is huge, there maybe some advertising banners, again these will before stuff that we like and or use, you know the stuff we would recommend to our families and friends.

The bottom line is, this web site and the podcasts are for you, to help you and ultimately for the dogs. Our goal is to help improve the lives of dogs everywhere. We need your help. We want you to read and or listen to the articles and podcasts. We want the articles to be interesting, so you keep coming back. We are going to feature products we use and like, so you know they are good and work. We welcome feed back, on how we are doing. We want to know what you want, from us, what you want hear and read in the future. We want to hear any experiences that you have. We can all learn from this interaction.

Our show format is going to be simple. We are going to run podcasts and blog articles that are just long enough to cover the topic and short enough to keep you interested. We are going to keep each session to one topic, so it is simple and not confusing and easy to search. We want the content to be pertinent to what you are doing, you should be able to finish reading and or listening and apply what was said. We want your feed back to tell us what is working and what isn’t. I can’t stress this enough, this is your website, your podcast, everything here is to help you!

I was listening to one podcaster and he talked about Karma. We are hosting podcasts and blogs to help dogs. The more we help others, the more that comes back to us. Karma is a wonderful thing, it can really help you, if you are honest and up front or it can really haunt you if you are deceitful. WE want to take the high road and help as many dogs as possible. That is why we are transparent and honest, we don’t have any hidden agenda, we want to help dogs, we advertise to pay for the cost of the website and podcasts. In the future if we have advertising banners and make enough for us to dive into dog rescue full time, that would be great. But, it is all about the dogs and the people who help them.

We are starting podcasts to increase our following. People will listen to a 40 minute podcast more than they will sit down and read a 1,000 word blog. Plus you can listen to the podcast while driving to work. So, after this podcast, I will go back and start converting older blogs into podcasts and post them. In the future, all blogs will be podcast a all podcasts will be blogged. I’m not sure if I will transcript the podcast into a blog, word for word or narrate the podcast in the blog. We will have to see which works better.

We have a Facebook page so that you can follow us and join that page, www.facebook.com/daisysrescue . We have a twitter page www.twitter.com/daisysrescue . Our own website www.daisysrescue.com . You can email us at daisysrescue@comcast.net .

We try to help rescues out by featuring dogs on wednesdays on www.daisysrescue.com , under the dogs menu and Seniors on Sundays, under the Seniors menu. We have an events page where rescues can lists their events and a rescue page, where rescues can ask to be listed. For those other animal advocates we have an other rescue page as well.

This is all for you and the dogs. Please visit and down load us often and please refer us to your friends. www.daisysrescue.com

Daisy’s Rescue, has a dog and pet supply portal for all of your dog and pet care needs. We also have a “generic” Amazon portal, where you can go and buy anything on Amazon and we will get the advertising fee. Remember we are here for you and the dogs.

This is Charlie Moe saying thank you for listening to Daisy’s Rescue, A Resource for Dog Rescue and Care Podcast 1 and we look forward to hearing from you. Take Care and thank you for helping the dogs.

Link to Daisy’s Rescue Podcast Episode 1http://www.podcastgarden.com/podcast/daisysrescueepisode1

Daisy’s Rescue is now on ITunes! Catch our first Podcast. Here is the linkhttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/daisys-rescue-episode-1/id756986926

Help stop Iowa University from teaching how to start Puppy Mills

Welcome to Daisy’s Rescue. We are all about helping owners and rescue groups to learn helpful tricks and tips on how to take care of your dog(s). We are here for you to help with useful information on all types of routine dog care. Please feel free to leave comments and questions you may have for us. For your convenience we have added links to the products that we like to use, here in the article for you to find them more easily.

Today’s session is about trying to stop future puppy mills from starting up. Iowa State University has created a course on how to start and run puppy mills. I wrote them an email and they have not replied. I made a few Dog Advocate’s aware of what is going on and a petition was created. The author of the petition wrote to the Iowa University and this is what was written and done.

As I think you know, I posted a petition on Change.org objecting to a course in Commercial Dog Breeding offered by the Iowa State University School of Veterinary Medicine.  The director of the program that teaches the courseposted this comment to the petition:
The materials on Regulatory Compliance for Commercial Dog Breeders were developed by the Center for Food Security and Public Health with funding from the United States Department of Agriculture. The USDA has authority to regulate commercial dog breeders under the Animal Welfare Act. The web-based materials on Regulatory Compliance for Commercial Dog Breeders are used by the USDA to help enforce the Animal Welfare Act. Being aware of the regulations discourages some people from becoming commercial dog breeders. Removing the materials from the website would result in less compliance with animal welfare standards by commercial dog breeders, and more people becoming dog breeders. We do not want that outcome.
I posted this reply:
Thank you for your very thoughtful reply. I am glad that we agree that we don’t want less compliance with animal welfare standards and more dog breeders. I also understand your rationale for this course. What I think you overlook, however, is that by offering the course you are giving legitimacy and validation to a practice that shouldn’t exist at all.
We need to let Iowa State University know that we do not want more puppy mills and we don’t want them teaching people to “commercially Farm dogs”. When there are 4 million dogs murdered each year, we do not need any more breeders to add to the over population.
Thank you from Daisy’s Rescue. We rely on our followers to make the difference.